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Guarding the faith of our faithful guardians

Lucas Hendricks serves on the Lutheran Military Support Group (lutheranmilitary.org) and is a member of Trinity, Woodbridge, Va.

Death. For the Christian, that word has lost the terror of a permanent event. We know that death is the beginning of life eternal in paradise. But what if your vocation regularly brings you face to face with mortality? You crave the reminder that death is temporary, because it looks, smells, and feels so permanent.

Our military men and women are either in combat, recovering from combat, or preparing to go into combat. They need soul care, but church involvement with the state is problematic. Attending a local congregation is an option—when they are stationed near one and have time to attend. But when deployed, or stationed far from a confessional church, they lose access to the sacrament and mutual encouragement. Yes, technology—when available—can connect them to biblically-sound resources. Yes, they can always read God’s Word. But what hungry souls they become after many months away from their Christian brothers and sisters!

Meanwhile, the military chaplaincy travels with them. They may hear familiar prayers and hymns, receive words of comfort and encouragement. But they also hear unfamiliar doctrine and subtle error that may scratch “itching ears.” All views are considered equal. If you think their Christian faith will be attacked in college, picture the same trials in the pressure of combat! The church has an obligation to their sheep that volunteer to be sheepdogs* for a season. So what can we do?

Service members

  • Know the regulations governing religious accommodation (such as for practices like our view of fellowship and close communion).
  • Take an active role in your own soul care—what the military calls spiritual fitness. This is about your readiness for combat and your resilience when faced with the horror of war.
  • Find out if there is a WELS/ELS church near you by going to yearbook.wels.net/unitsearch. Call the pastor to request his services.
  • Contact WELS Military Services (military@wels.net) and ask what they need from you.
  • Support your local congregation and WELS Military Services with your offerings.

Pastors

  • Learn about installations near you and introduce yourself to the senior chaplain.
  • Contact WELS Military Services (military@wels.net) to learn what sheep may be in your pasture. They can also offer suggestions for effective ministry.
  • Call on troops and their families at home. Become familiar with their circumstances.
  • Visit them at work. Meet their chaplain and their commander.
  • Invite them to take on tasks in your congregation that fit their schedule and abilities.

Synod leaders

  • The Armed Forces Chaplaincy Board needs to hear from you, not for their benefit, but for the benefit of our members in service.
  • Can we get WELS/ELS recognized as an option for religious preference? This would offer another statistical reporting avenue; more important, it would alert leadership and the unit chaplain to the unique religious needs under their command.
  • Sixteen years of conflict have taken their toll and WELS/ELS service members are not immune. Because of the military’s organization, they can be isolated from the greatest source of resiliency, the means of grace. Suicide and divorce, risky and illegal behaviors are symptoms of the stress. What a huge opportunity for our God! He offers the cure for sin, fear, hurt, hatred, war, death. What a huge opportunity for his church! We have the medicine of the gospel.

* The analogy refers to citizens (sheep), attackers (wolves), and protectors (sheepdogs).

 

 

 

It’s different in Deutschland

Paul Horn is chairman of the Military Services Committee and pastor of Mighty Fortress Lutheran Church, Hiram, Ga.

I have to pay to use the restroom at the gas station? I don’t get free refills on my coffee? I have to pay for water at the restaurant, and tell the waiter if I want my water “still” or with bubbles? What do you mean I can’t call an Uber? Isn’t that a German company? They don’t speak English in this village? Doesn’t everybody speak English? No stores are open on Sunday? But I don’t have everything I need to make dinner tonight!

Americans living on the German economy soon discover that some cultural norms in the United States are not normal in Europe. Even with global trade and Amazon there are some things you just can’t get in Germany. My wife and I experienced some of this “culture shock” this summer when we visited our civilian chaplain, Pastor Don Stuppy and his wife Marge, who serve the spiritual needs of our WELS members scattered throughout Europe.

Don and Marge were just six months into their new ministry when we arrived. We spent the next two weeks traveling over 1800km (1180 miles) with them to Munich, Vilseck, Zurich, Ramstein Air Base, and Wicker. This is a typical two weeks for the Stuppy’s. Once a month they also squeeze in the Netherlands and England!

One thing Americans cannot get in Germany every Sunday, especially Christians who belong to a confessional Lutheran church body, is the divine service with Holy Communion in English. Over two weekends the four of us met with WELS members in their homes or apartments, a military base chapel or a community center. The gatherings ranged from eight to twenty souls. Some locations had a piano, other places we used music from a laptop. But every place had what these American Lutherans needed: a familiar liturgy, God’s Word proclaimed, Christ crucified preached, his body and blood distributed, hymns sung in praise and thanks, their Savior’s blessing received with grateful hearts.

WELS members in Europe expressed their deep appreciation. Even though our chaplain is only able to visit them once or twice a month, they crave that time to be fed and nourished and encouraged, to hear the promises of their Savior, and to build up their brothers and sisters.
Here in the United States we can fill our coffee cup as many times as we want without paying extra. We can order a glass of water at a restaurant and not see it on the bill. We can shop on Sunday. We can go to church every week. Some of our brothers and sisters cannot. We thank God for providing this ministry in Europe so that we are able to faithfully bring God’s Word and sacrament to his people.

What can you do to support your brothers and sisters? Pray for our civilian chaplain, his wife, and the people they serve. Email our chaplain (welschaplain@gmail.com) and let him know you’re praying for our ministry in Europe. Consider adopting the European Civilian Chaplaincy as your next mission project in your school or church. Learn more about our services to the armed forces at wels.net/military. Then, instead of talking about all the things we can’t do, you’ll be saying, “Look what our God has enabled us to do!”

 

 

 

New online training for military contact pastors

Paul Wolfgramm, a member of the Military Services Committee, served with the U.S. Marines in Iraq.

A new narrated power point available at WELS.net University offers an introduction to the military mindset. The courses on WELS.net University, an online learning environment designed to support the training needs of the Wisconsin Synod, are free. Visit wnu.wels.net to create an account, explore the course categories, and enroll. “Training for Military Contact Pastors” is available under the Special Ministries heading.

The course addresses the need for making God’s Word available to our members on active duty, and offers tips and suggestions for our pastors to reach them. WELS Military Services can bring the Word to those who cannot regularly attend a Sunday morning church service. In addition, military members face potent and regular temptations such as alcohol abuse and pornography, and face unique challenges associated with marriage and post traumatic stress disorder. The second part of the presentation discusses the importance of a solid Christian education before entering the military; Distinctive Religious Group Leaders; ways to address the transient and remote nature of the military; worship locations; and ways to involve military veterans from the congregation.

The course is available to anyone, but is especially tailored to military contact pastors (MCP’s) without military experience. WELS has over 100 MCP’s throughout the continental United States, serving congregations close to military installations. Although these men are called primarily to serve their local congregation, they also perform vital work in reaching out to the military. Active duty members rely on MCP’s to be familiar with military protocol, to serve them with God’s Word and sacraments, and to provide Christian counseling. The training course ensures that MCP’s have a basic understanding of the military and the synod resources available for their work.

Finally, all members should be aware of wels.net/refer. If you or someone you love is on active duty, in the Guard or Reserves, please register at this easy-to-use website. Without this information, WELS Military Services cannot provide spiritual support to those who are in our armed forces. Registered personnel receive a welcome package and regular devotions, plus ways to connect with our national civilian chaplain, our European civilian chaplain, our military contact pastors, and fellow WELS members on base.

When service members deploy, move overseas, permanently change station, or leave the military, PLEASE UPDATE wels.net/refer. (Don’t forget to notify your pastor as well.) Military service removes our members from their former and familiar spiritual support group. Please go right now to wels.net/refer and help connect yourself or a loved one with God’s Word.

 

 

 

“I think you could be good at it”

Bill Truebenbach is a staff minister and program consultant for Jesus Cares Ministries, a ministry of The Lutheran Home Association. His home church is Morning Star, Jackson, Wis.

Twenty-nine years of public sector work had done me in. I resigned my full-time job for a no-time job. God has always supplied, so I walked my streets praying for work in his field. A guest pastor had given me the itch by talking about volunteer ministry, and visits to a prison with my brother had given me a taste. There had to be more I could do.

One day my pastor dropped by with some news. “They’re looking for someone for Jesus Cares Ministries, and I think you could be good at it,” he suggested. “Great!” I replied, before going to look up what Jesus Cares Ministries (JCM) was. That was sixteen years ago.

I had no background in what The Lutheran Home Association (TLHA) and JCM were looking for, but that did not stop me from applying. They hired me! Really? I now reflect on how God has always been in control, and the many blessings he has provided to this sinner. He has allowed me to be part of a ministry that serves people with a developmental disability. He allowed me to become a second career staff minister. And now, as I approach retirement at the end of this year, he will allow me to continue advocating for families who have a loved one with special needs.

How did I learn to work with people who have a developmental disability? I read, I studied, I attended seminars and webinars. They help. Yet the best way is to just work with someone with special needs. Many who do this work have said, “We do not teach them; they teach us.”

One who became a close friend was David Koss. Although he wore hearing aids in both ears and had some cognitive challenges, he was able to live independently. We did so many things together: basketball games, football games, movies, concerts, restaurants, fishing. David faithfully called me almost every day to see how my day was going, what I was doing, and if any new JCM programs were starting. He went with me to an annual meeting in Belle Plaine, Minn., so he could see the TLHA campus and I interviewed him in front of the attendees. When I asked David what he wanted to see in the future he said, “That there is a JCM program in every church in our synod.”

David’s passion for the ministry fueled my passion, and reminded me of the importance of serving all people. In his last years he moved to a facility where he could be cared for. It was a joy for me to speak at his memorial service and share his faith one more time. David loved the Lord, and I know many more like him in the ministry.

There are so many memories, joys, victories, and satisfactions I could share: being at the baptism of an adult with special needs; the confirmation of someone with special needs; hearing their professions of faith; seeing their smiles; going to the Lord’s Supper with them on their first time; a journey to Malawi, Africa for Jesus Cares. What more could one ask for?

I have been blessed to help churches and pastors with their disability ministry needs. JCM has grown, yet many are still not being served. There is a great need for our churches to consider a disability ministry such as JCM Bible class or simplified “Worship at the Cross” service. Learn more at tlha.org/jesus-cares-ministries or call Rev. Joel Gaertner at 888-600-TLHA (8542).

There is also an urgent need for parents of special needs children to be connected with other Christian parents who are starting or have been on that journey. My hope and prayer is that through the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Ministry branch of Special Ministries (wels.net/iddm) I can connect those parents online, with small parent-mentoring groups. Get them connected. Get them talking.

Why? They’re looking for someone. Want to join me? I think you could be good at it.

 

 

 

Wheeling around Camp SOUTH

My name is Alex Timothy Heldman. I am 12 years old and going into 7th grade. I live in Wisconsin but heard of Camp SOUTH through my Uncle Duane Vance. Camp SOUTH, which stands for Sharing Our Unity Through Him, is held in Covington, Ga. for kids entering 4th through 8th grade.

I was born with a condition called spina bifida so I have difficulty walking without braces for my legs. My parents decided to let me try out the camp and it was lots of fun! The food was good, the kids were nice, and there was a lot to do. This was my first time at camp and I had to do things a little differently, since I have used a wheelchair since I was three years old. In order to get around the campground I rode in my van with my dad since the camp is very hilly.

I was thankful that the camp allowed me to skip the water, mud, and running events and go bowling instead. I didn’t bowl my all-time best but still had a lot of fun. I was surprised that we were able to have drinks and snacks as we bowled. Tuesday night’s “Survivor Challenge: You Can’t Win Trivia” was great since we could party to the music while we answered Bible trivia questions. After the evening activities, during free time I played golf-cornhole and pingpong until it was snack time. I also enjoyed watching the other kids play ship-shore down by the lake and making s’mores on Thursday night.

I was on the black team and we didn’t win the victory medals on Tuesday or Wednesday. Finally on Thursday the black team won the victory medals after the “Recruiter vs. Recruiter: Battle of Honor” and in bowling, which meant I got to go to the front of the line for lunch and dinner on Thursday.

There was so much to do that each day just flew by. We were encouraged to arrive at the activity center early before devotions so everyone was on time and we could watch fun videos until devotion started. There were even board games that we could check out and play if we had extra energy. I would say that my favorite things about camp were playing games in the evening and the music that was part of each morning and evening devotion. It was great to have a live band to lead all the praise songs. As we were getting in the van to leave on Friday morning I told my dad: “Camp was so fun! Can we come back next year?”

My mom and dad were kind of nervous to allow me to attend the camp because it was not specific to special needs, but Pastor Jon Enter did a good job familiarizing them with the layout of the camp facilities so they were well prepared in what to bring for me for the week. I would encourage other children with special needs or different needs to not be afraid to try Camp SOUTH. It was an amazing time and I am glad God gave me this opportunity to hear his Word and make new friends.

For more information about Camp SOUTH, send an e-mail to: info@HopeLutheranWPB.com.

 

 

 

 

A purpose in disability

Elise Rosenbaum is a senior at Martin Luther College. She grew up at Grace, St. Joseph, Mich.

Growing up with a brother who has Down syndrome had more impact on me than I initially realized. I never saw Matt as being that much different from my other siblings—in fact, some people would ask if Matt and my youngest brother Adam were twins. I cannot imagine life without Matt and I know that God had a purpose in placing him in my family.

Last December, Matt put on his wish list: “Elise home for Christmas.” But I would not be there because I was going on a Kingdom Workers service immersion trip to Malawi. I was thrilled to be going to Africa after desiring it for so long.

My interest in Africa began when a new girl joined my class in sixth grade. Her family had just moved back to the United States after her dad had served for several years as a missionary in Malawi. I loved hearing her stories and dreamed of going there myself someday. Just nine years later, my dream became a reality. I asked four girls to join me: Bekah Bartz (the missionary’s daughter), Elizabeth Bergemann, Brittany Krause, and Emily Unke. We applied, were interviewed, and were eager to learn and grow from the experiences ahead.

Two short weeks in Africa taught me a great deal. One week was spent helping with Vacation Bible School; the other was observing the disability ministry. I loved getting to see the work that they were doing. There is no fancy medical equipment and the volunteers do not have much specific training, but it was incredible to see what they are able to accomplish with what they do have.

Chikondi, a young boy who has cerebral palsy, was a great example of this. The volunteers set up sticks and Chikondi had to practice walking over them. Once he made it through all of them, we cheered. He had the BIGGEST smile ever. It was so rewarding to see Chikondi’s and the volunteers’ faces light up with pride at his accomplishment.

The simplified “Worship at the Cross” services they put on are very similar to those put on by Jesus Cares Ministries in the United States. The volunteers go to the people since traveling to the church is hard, if not impossible, for them.

Their greatest challenge, however, is changing the mindset toward disability in their culture. The president of the Lutheran Church of Central Africa explained that many people in Africa see a disability as a curse. They hide their loved ones away in their homes and don’t give them the proper care. Families don’t bring their loved ones to the church for help. It is by word of mouth that the church finds out about those in their villages who need their help. The ministry’s vital task is to share the news that God has rescued all people from sin and he has a purpose for all people.

The disability ministry in Malawi is serving God by providing assistance and support, as well as sharing Jesus’ love for those who have a disability. Rather than being a punishment for sin, God has a purpose in disability.

Interested in this service immersion trip? Learn more at kingdomworkers.com/opportunities.

 

 

 

Who will serve those who serve?

DiAnn Krigbaum is a member of New Life Lutheran Church, Rockford, Ill.

What happens when a police officer’s family is in crisis and needs to call 911? Easy answer, right? When I’m finished sharing my experience you might have a different perspective.

I had more than twenty years on the job as a Rockford, Ill. police officer. For over half of my career I served as a detective, investigating and fighting for justice for victims of violence. Too often those victims were women, children, and families.

In 2008 my family became the victim when we were traumatized by divorce. My twin sons had just begun college; my 12-year-old daughter was in sixth grade. When Satan attacks us emotionally it affects us physically and spiritually as well. I was a severely depressed mother who had become the primary caregiver. I was on overload—physically, emotionally, financially, and spiritually.

My daughter was profoundly affected. Ashlee has an intellectual disability and had no words to express her pain. We adopted her at age five, when she had already endured more rejection, shame, and loss than someone her age should. A crisis social worker came to my home to help with the anger and fallout.

As the situation escalated the social worker told me to call 911. I couldn’t. I froze. I was the police! I was supposed to help solve and fix problems. My mind was racing. What would my co-workers and supervisors think of me? The enormous shame and pain from loss and failure left me unable to move.

The collateral damage severely wounded every member of my family. I nearly lost my job. Had God abandoned us?

But God did not forget about me and my family. He appeared “undercover” in the form of a chaplain. My pastor at the time was also a volunteer police chaplain. He came to my rescue by repeatedly reminding me that God was not trying to harm me but to give me hope and a future (Jeremiah 29:11-13). As my companion at difficult court appearances, doctor visits, and therapy appointments, he showed me what it means to be a faithful, merciful friend and advocate. He became my spiritual advisor and listened to more tearful conversations than I can count.

By God’s grace, I survived in my career until age 50, when I retired with a police pension and sufficient means to take care of my family as a single mother.

That’s when Pastor Phil asked me to take chaplain courses with him through Martin Luther College. He suggested it would help my faith grow and allow others to learn from my experiences.

In an online forum with other pastors and lay students, I was able to share my experiences as a police officer and spiritually wounded WELS member. This provided healing, learning, spiritual growth, and friendships with many Christian friends and called workers. In 2014 I received my Chaplain Certificate from Martin Luther College.

Since then I have been serving as a volunteer police chaplain in my community. God has provided several opportunities to serve families and women in crisis. I’ve been able to witness and minister to them, telling them about my God and Savior. He is a just and merciful Father who fights for the fatherless, the widows, and the orphans.

We all have a story. God does not define us by our failures. Rather he calls us back to him to remind us who we are—children of God.

Visit mlc-wels.edu/continuing-education/wels-chaplain-certificate to learn more about the Chaplain Certification Program and see the courses offered in 2018. Financial aid is available for many classes.

 

 

Assist your new called worker with the transition

Matt Kock is a member of Trinity Lutheran Church, Minocqua, Wis.

Our church and school recently welcomed three called workers and their families. We wanted to help them with the transition and on-boarding process, which would provide a good test for our new Care Committee for Called Workers (CCCW).

We streamlined communication as much as possible, with one main point of contact from our congregation and school. We also tried to consolidate information into a single message vs. sending multiple notes. We recognized how busy their lives would be and wanted to simplify things as much as possible. By starting the process well in advance of their arrival dates, they wouldn’t feel rushed.

Pastor Stephen Luchterhand notes: “This cross-country move (Arizona to Wisconsin) was a challenging one for our family, especially because our children are older (late high school to college age). The evident care and concern, attention to detail and intentional communication, and enthusiastic search for solutions by Trinity’s CCCW lessened our anxiety considerably and removed considerable barriers during the process.”

It’s important to keep the called worker’s family in mind during this process. We placed pictures of the new called workers and their families in the fellowship hall shortly after the calls had been accepted. Not only did this allow our members to put a face with the name, but it reminded the congregation to keep the families in their prayers.

We also asked about the family’s areas of interest. For those seeking employment we came up with a list of businesses and contacts for them to consider, as well as congregation members who could be used as references. Our tuition fund application was shared with students attending Luther Prep School.

Teachers Mike and MeLissa Wieting were appreciative. “It was so nice to be referred to members of the community who could help us with buying a home and moving to the area. They had names of a realtor, mortgage company, an insurance contact, and a moving company that led us through the intimidating process. We had never had to purchase our own home before so we had lots of questions. Our care committee even stepped in to preview homes on our behalf before we made a special trip to the area to see a property. Being a few hours away, an overwhelming process was made easier due to our CCCW.”

While the Call cover letter shared a summary of compensation and benefits, there were many details that needed to be addressed during the transition, such as: the timing and frequency of payroll; local banking options; tax withholding elections (yes, Social Security can be withheld on line 6 of Form W-4 for ministers of the gospel); and contributions to the Health Savings Account and 403b plan. There are nuances between the different health insurance plans offered through WELS. Understanding these differences, and/or coordinating a call with a benefit specialist to review together, would be productive.

Now that the called workers are here, we have stayed in touch. From helping to find a chiropractor and contractor, to directing them to a good beach for a family swim, there was much to share as they settled in. Most important, we “pray continually” for our called workers (1 Thessalonians 5:17). This encouragement has become a regular part of our CCCW report to the congregation.

Interested in starting a Care Committee at your congregation? Find resources and a how-to video at csm.welsrc.net/download-csm/called-worker-care.

 

 

 

Luther and sign language

Amid a host of Reformation 500 celebration ideas, from Lego Luther figures to books and movies, this one stands out. The Mission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MDHH) has produced an eight-minute video that uses sign language, voice, and captioning to explain Luther’s Seal. The Reformer designed the seal to symbolize the heart of his teachings about faith in Jesus. As a graphic adds each part of the seal, Matthew Buchholz explains the meaning using American Sign Language.

The video is a special gift to deaf Lutherans who may be interested in learning about the symbolism of Luther’s seal. MDHH also hopes that it will be used with children to teach them about Luther’s seal while seeing it described in sign language.

You’ll find the video at the Special Ministries Resource Center at csm.welsrc.net/mdhh. It will be a fun way to draw people into the anniversary celebration and show them the eternal blessing of faith in Jesus. Share it on social media and with your family, too!

 

 

 

Tuition grants for American Sign Language class

Martin Luther College is offering American Sign Language and Introduction to Deaf Culture (ASL 8001), an online, three-credit course, from January 3 to May 4, 2018. The course provides the basic foundation of American Sign Language through an overview of deaf culture and an introduction to the signing of finger spelling and basic vocabulary with beginning-level conversations. The instructor is Matthew Buchholz, a member of the WELS Mission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

Here is what previous students have said:

“I never expected to receive so much from this experience. . .I have a deeper understanding of the culture, needs, and resources available to the deaf and hard of hearing community and a whole bunch of signs in my arsenal.” (Trisha)

“I already have oodles and oodles of ideas on how I can revamp some of my lesson plans for next year to include sign language.” (Sandy)
“Thank you also for making this course available and affordable. Beginning to learn ASL has been a wonderful challenge, but for me, learning about deaf culture in this course has been invaluable. I hope that this course is made available in the future so that more people can have a greater understanding of the deaf and hard of hearing.” (Cori)

“I didn’t really know what to expect when enrolling in this class. I would have never imagined learning all that we have learned.” (Jill)
A limited number of $450 grants toward tuition are available upon request and will be paid upon the completion of the course. Learn more at mlc-wels.edu/continuing-education/registration. A poster to promote the class can be downloaded from the Special Ministries Resource Center at csm.welsrc.net/mission-for-the-deaf-and-hard-of-hearing.

 

 

 

2018 WELS Lutheran Seniors convention

Seniors from any congregation in the WELS or ELS should set aside Oct. 10-12, 2018, for the OWLS Convention for Seniors, which will be held at the beautiful Osthoff Resort, in Elkhart Lake, Wis. The theme of the convention will be “Finish Your Race.”

Whether your congregation has a seniors group or an OWLS chapter or no senior gatherings for fun and service, you’ll find fellowship, learning, and inspiration at the OWLS Convention for Seniors. Watch the WELS website in spring of 2018 for more information.

 

 

Special offers that never expire

Allied 100 – AED Superstore, one of our ShopWELS partners, has special offers that never expire for automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for WELS organizations and individuals.

You can use coupon code WELS100 to receive $100 off the purchase of a new AED or AED Value Package. Or you can use coupon code WELSACC to receive 10% off the purchase of most AED replacement supplies and accessories if you already have an AED at your church or school. Contact Amber Neller by e-mail or call 800-991-6584.

For recent news and information about AEDs and heart health, check out the AED Superstore blogs at aedsuperstore.com/blogs.

Reminiscence From a Retired Nurse

For those of you too young to remember I will share a story from nursing school; when we attended class at the hospital! My story begins with my joy of being Lutheran and my love for nursing. I was able to hold onto both even as I attended classes at Milwaukee County General Hospital in their School of Nursing. My joy came from the interaction we had with Pastor Arnold Schroeder, who was the Chaplain at the hospital. He was the original model for what is now known as “Institutional Ministries” in the WELS. He was fantastic with the patients, and we were also blessed to have him as a guest lecturer each year (yes, even for a public education program). The focus of his talk with us was how we could serve God through our careers. To be a Lutheran and have one of our pastors come and give such an inspiring message made me so proud and feeling blessed. Pastor Schroeder was truly a gifted speaker.

Years later as I was working as a nurse on a psychiatric unit, the words of Pastor Schroeder became very useful. The patients were challenging, the staff very supportive and yet we all struggled to keep going some days. I was known to many as the “WELS lady,” as I shared the joy of my faith, my church family in Muskego, and the happiness I felt by singing in the choir. There were other Lutherans on staff from St. Philip’s in Milwaukee and we must have made an impression on people as there was a real effort made by them to act in both word and deed in a Christian manner. I know that approaching our work from this viewpoint helped us find ways to bring peace to the unit and could feel more confident in our own safety. At the time, while still in school, I didn’t understand how writing a spiritual assessment for my patients would be a vital skill in my career. I approached this part of the care plan from my Lutheran faith and am so grateful to have had this foundation, and I am sure is why I received A’s.

By Gail Maxwell, RN
(edited by Wendy Crary-with permission)

 

 

A Resourceful RN

I am one of several nurses in our small, rural church in Fairfax, Minn. Over the years, I have found that when a member of our congregation needs medical assistance during a service or event, the only tools I had at my disposal in church were my hands and my watch. As an ICU nurse in a local hospital, I am used to having all the necessary nursing tools for any situation that arises. We do not have a formal parish nurse program in our church, so this is when Thrivent Choice Dollars came to the rescue! I applied for a Thrivent grant in the amount of $250 to help with some basic parish nursing supplies for our church. With this money, I purchased a manual blood pressure cuff (with two sizes of cuffs) and a battery operated, automatic blood pressure cuff for the congregation to use if one of our nurses are not present. I bought a stethoscope, CPR masks, large first aid kit, gloves, ice packs, hand gel and cleaning wipes (for use on the equipment in between patients). All of these items were placed in a clear bin for all to see and use and is located in the narthex of the church for easy access. I would encourage everyone to use their Thrivent Choice Dollars to jump start their parish nursing program!
By Amy Buboltz, BSN, RN

 

 

News and notes: Fall 2017

Welcome new Council Members: Mary Bruskewitz and Kristi Opper have kindly offered to join our small team and add their God given talent to our efforts! We welcome you with open arms, and pray you find the work fulfilling.

Spring Conference—Mid April 2018, at Martin Luther College, New Ulm, Minn.: With an excursion planned to Bethany Lutheran College’s new Nursing Program for a tour of the facility and fellowship. Stay tuned for more specifics as the Council and Conference Planning team finalize arrangements.

Parish Nurse Course: Online Summer 2017 had students from California, Minnesota, and Nebraska. Keep these nurses in your prayers as they apply that knowledge and they establish a parish nurse ministry in their congregation and a big thank you to Christian Aid & Relief for the matching funds grant to help with tuition costs!

Stateside Opportunity—Nurse Coordinator: Have a love for missions? The Central Africa Medical Mission is looking for a Registered Nurse to serve on our stateside committee. While the nurse coordinator must be an RN, extensive knowledge of CAMM is not necessary. Those interested must be WELS or ELS and have a willingness to learn about the influence CAMM has on those we serve in Zambia and Malawi. Please contact Linda Liesener at cammcontact@charter.net or Shelly Sievert at sievertsr@gmail.com.

 

 

 

 

Two ShopWELS specials that end soon

Hidden in plain sight

Our ShopWELS partner, Ad Quest Promotions, offers promotional, logoed items and has a fall sale until October 15, 2017. Anything and everything “camo” is on sale. Does your church or school hold a fall trip? Do your Pioneers or Girl Pioneers group need a promotional item at its next event? Contact Ad Quest Promotions for more details. These special prices won’t be around long before they go into hiding!

25% off Shepherd’s Staff 2017

Get the organizational tools you need so you can focus on what matters most—the spiritual care of your members. With these church management software features offered by Concordia Technology Solutions at your fingertips, you’ll save time, improve your record-keeping accuracy, and create detailed reports just when you need them. Learn more

Take a stand against sitting

Our ShopWELS partner, Complete Office of Wisconsin, is now stocking a Fellowes Lotus sit-stand workstation (black) and this is why . . .

Over the past 10 years study after study has confirmed sitting for prolonged periods of time is harmful to your health. Some of the negative effects include an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes, links to high blood pressure, and elevated cholesterol. As a proponent of workspace management solutions, Fellowes wanted to create a product for this problem. Their next generation sit-stand products combine a wealth of research and product development with their deep understanding of the office workspace. They’re designed to be easy to use, adjustable, and worry-free. Plus, they’re engineered with the durability to transition from sitting to standing multiple times a day. All this adds up to a better sit-stand experience and one you’ll want to use every day.

View a video highlighting the features and benefits of the Fellowes Lotus sit-stand workstation.

Contact our WELS rep, Melanie Lepper at Complete Office, if you are interested in learning more.

Acoustics, the spoken word, and music

The spoken word and acoustic music can “play nice together” in the worship space, while preserving the architectural beauty of the church. What is needed are well-designed sound systems and room acoustics that work well together as architectural elements in a balanced electro-acoustic system. DSH Audio Visions, a long standing partner of ShopWELS,  can help you put it all together. Contact David Hosbach at dhosbach@dshaudiovisions.com or visit the website at www.dshaudiovisions.com for more information.

FinalWeb specials

FinalWeb is a longstanding partner of ShopWELS and offers websites, live streaming services, and mobile apps for churches and schools. We are pleased to share the following specials available from FinalWeb through Oct. 1, 2017.

Bundled package for new customers:

  • Website, Live Streaming (250 hour plan), and Mobile App bundle for $49/month
  • Two free months of service for new signups

For more information, and to take advantage of these offers, visit www.finalweb.com/wels2017

Current customers:
Visit http://www.finalweb.com/new to test drive the new Finalweb 2.0 beta! This vastly improved website creation engine is now available for use with new features being added daily.

Learn more

ShopWELS at Synod Convention 2017

If you are attending the 64th Biennial Convention of WELS, welcome! We hope you have time to find the ShopWELS display table. Once there you will find a brief slideshow of the current ShopWELS partners as well as some of the specials being offered to you as a delegate.

There are also some giveaways from some of the partners. You might also be interested in putting your name in a drawing for things like: an iPad (FinalWeb), an ASUS Chromebook (Troxell Communications), a badminton game, a bag toss game, a horse shoe set, a spike ball game (School Specialty), or gift basket of office supplies (Complete Office of Wisconsin).

If you aren’t attending the 64th Biennial Convention of WELS, don’t feel left out. We have a webpage with the information that is being shared at the synod convention. We hope that on that page or any of the partner pages you find information that could save you, your church, school, or organization some money on items you may need to purchase in the near future. Learn more

MLP reaching Malawi and beyond

Imagine if you could speak 47 different languages. Suppose you are able to…

Greet someone in Nuer.
Ask for directions in Burmese.
Order food in Kurdish.
Say a prayer in Urdu.
Read a book in Tagalog.
Explain a concept in Mizo.
Tell an idiom in Russian.

Sound improbable?  Even impossible to speak so many languages?

Rev. Nate Seiltz1 can!

Well, to be more accurate, Multi-Language Publications can.  Rev. Seiltz, former WELS missionary to Dominican Republic and Haiti–and a Spanish speaker himself –is currently the Director of the Multi-Language Publications (MLP).  He travels the world making sure that the Word is getting out and the Word is getting in.

In homes.
In schools.
In congregations.
In hearts.

Try to wrap your head around these numbers: in its 20+ year history, MLP to date has printed over 2.9 million items2 in 47 languages!  I guess the Word has gotten around and is getting around.  But now consider Rev. Seiltz’s vision and MLPs goal:

“To reach 100 million people with the gospel in the next ten years with the additional goal of having at least 2 million people using discipleship training media produced by MLP.”

“это не мелочь”

In Russian, “It’s no small thing!” You might say, “That’s no small potatoes!”

100 million people hearing the gospel never is. Reaching even just one is not insignificant. Heaven rejoices when even one coin is found.3

If you want to meet someone passionate about reaching out to lost souls, sit down with Rev. Seiltz. He realizes the MLP potential and knows that it’s not merely about ordering food or asking for directions in many languages.

He shared this story:

“I met a young Indian man in an airport in India. He was Christian pastor…I asked him if he had any converts from Hinduism and he said ‘yes.’ I asked, ‘What are some good ways to reach them?’” He replied: ‘Really the only thing that works is the gospel.’”

Good answer. No…great answer.

So just think, in that respect, then, it is about food: Jesus, the Bread of Life4 and the Living Water!5  And it is about directions:  the one way to heaven!  Jesus is it!  John emphasizes, “no one comes to the Father except through him.”6

According to the Scriptures, not only is there only one road, it’s also a bit narrow.7

But there’s room for all.

Because of MLP, some people who speak and read Nuer or Burmese or Kurdish or any of the other 44 languages can now discover the amazing, bewilder-ing, perplexing wonders of God in Christ Jesus.

By the way, I’m just borrowing those words, “amazing, bewildering and perplexing,” from Acts 2. There you will find the story of the original MLP, the Multi-Language Pentecost. That’s the day when people of different nations suddenly heard Galilean locals speak their own native tongue. It raised eyebrows as well as accusations. It probably would have been headlines in the Daily News. More than surprising and greater than astonishing, it was…

Amazing!
Bewildering!
Perplexing!

Not just the men, but the message. Especially the message.

Sin and Savior. Law and Gospel. Hell and heaven. Works and Grace. Repentance and forgiveness. Ah, yes, forgiveness.

Really?  I, too, am forgiven?

The message of today’s 21st century MLP is the same message as the first-century MLP:

Yes, you are forgiven in Jesus Christ!  Believe it!

No wonder Nate writes in MLPs 2016-2017 Catalogue: “The majority of MLP products are evangelism and Bible Study materials.  These can be used by anyone who sees a need for ministering to others in Christ.”

After all, who doesn’t need that kind of message?

We, on the Malawi field, were blessed to have Rev. Seiltz visit us this month of March 2017.8 He took time to travel to “The Warm (and these days, rainy) Heart of Africa” to share information, goals and visions of MLP.  He met with the Lutheran Mission missionaries and with some of the national pastors in the Lutheran Church of Central Africa, Malawi Synod. (LCCA-MS).

His visit revealed, not only his work but his joy.

His joy?

“Being able to put gospel materials in different languages so many people can learn of their Savior and grow in their faith. Working with national churches and missionaries, brothers and sisters in the faith as they minister in their Savior’s Kingdom.”

Dear Mission Partner, do you have a friend who speaks Spanish?  Got a Ukrainian neighbor?  Is there a member in your church whose mother tongue is Chinese?  Anyone you know come from Korea or Japan?

Do you speak his/her language?

Even if you can’t, MLP can.  If it can’t, it’ll do what it takes to speak that language, too.  After all, it wants to help you in…

Declaring the Wonders of God.9

By Missionary John Holtz, Malawi, Africa

  1. Seiltz is married to Natalie and they have 3 children Brett, Carlos, Angela. They live in Jackson, Wis., and are members of Morning Star Lutheran Church.  His MLP office is at the Synod Headquarters, (Center for Mission and Ministry) in Waukesha, Wis.  Rev. Seiltz regularly travels internationally and domestically for MLP promotion.
  2. Items such as Sunday School materials, The Promise, Bible Stories in Pictures, Evangelism movies, What the Bible and Lutherans Teach, Book of Prayers, etc.
  3. Luke 15:3-10
  4. John 6:25-59
  5. John 4
  6. John 14:6
  7. Matthew 7:14
  8. On this same trip to Malawi, Rev. Seiltz also visited Cameroon and Zambia for the same purpose of promoting MLP and its materials.
  9. Acts 2:11

 


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The how’s and why’s of a new program Academia Cristo update

It started with some statistics and became an “aha” moment. These are the beginnings of a new program for MLP.

In January 2013, the Excelsior newspaper in Mexico reported that the average citizen in Mexico read only half a book a year and that 35% of those surveyed said they had never read any book (www.excelsior.com.mx/2013/01/18/879972). Anecdotal evidence from other countries in Latin America seems to reflect similar experiences. Don’t misunderstand: it’s not that they can’t read, it’s just they don’t have the habit of reading for pleasure.

When Missionary Mike Hartman came across those statistics, he started observing that at bus stops and at home, in waiting rooms and restaurants, you rarely saw anyone with a book. But you did see people with smartphones, reading Facebook posts and watching videos.

That led to the “aha” moment.

Missionary Hartman approached Multi-Language Publications and asked the question: What if, instead of spending our budget on printing and distributing books that might never be used, we converted those books into videos and distributed them over the Internet? MLP was willing to give it a try.

And so, MLP partnered with Latin American missions to launch “Academia Cristo.” The initial vision became a detailed plan with this goal: to use everyday technologies to empower Spanish speakers to plant and develop churches that faithfully proclaim God’s word.

You could say there are two phases to Academia Cristo. Phase one involves “sowing seeds” to become a known entity among Spanish speakers. It starts with sending evangelism fliers to literally millions of people through social media, especially Facebook. Those fliers invite people to visit the Academia Cristo website where they can access devotions, movies, hymns, liturgies, streamed church services, and prepared Bible studies that they can use on their own or to lead a group – all for free.

Over 2.3 million unique visitors have visited the website, and hundreds of thousands have downloaded resources. We thank God for these resources and the many partners who develop and allow us to share them… Thank you!

Phase two involves personal contact with individuals. Every Spanish speaker in the world is invited to take Academia Cristo’s introductory class. This 10-lesson course entitled Here I Am is taught live over the Internet or face-to-face. In the class, students learn essential truths about God’s word as well as a simple way to teach Bible stories and God’s amazing good news to others.  For a final project, students take a video of themselves sharing one of the Bible stories they learned in class with someone else.

Those who successfully complete Here I Am are invited to continue to study in the Academia Cristo Live program. Many of these students are connected to a pastoral mentor. The mentors encourage and guide these individuals as they grow in the knowledge of the truth, work to share God’s good news with others, and ultimately strive to plant and develop churches in their communities that clearly and faithfully teach God’s word.

Almost 2,000 new contacts have registered to study the Here I Am course, and 120 of those have expressed the desire to continue their training while at the same time gathering others around God’s word to form new churches.

You don’t have to speak Spanish yourself to participate. Just share the www.academiacristo.com website with anyone you know who speaks Spanish. And pray in whatever language your heart speaks that God continue to bless this united effort to empower Spanish speakers to faithfully proclaim God’s word to the world.

We invite you to watch a video update to learn more.

 

 

MLP PRODUCTS

View a complete catalog of Multi-Language Publication’s products.


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MLP as partner in mission fields

When the gospel hits the hearts of people and excites them to share Christ’s love with others, the Holy Spirit does amazing things. Look at the impact of Apostle Paul and the rest of the early Christian Church! Read about centuries upon centuries of people passionately stretching out with the good news of Jesus into territories where people never heard of him.

But that doesn’t mean it always goes well. It didn’t always for Paul. There are plenty of accounts throughout history of reduplication of efforts or clashes over direction. Often it detoured God’s people from a clear focus and cooperation in our great co-mission: making disciples of all nations so all can know Christ’s love and live with him forever. How do we maximize the gifts and responsibilities of our mission workforce and minimize the obstacles?

The One East Asia Team is an example of bringing different groups together to marshal all the forces into a cohesive team. Individual ministries that have developed independently with their own unique focus and administration have come together to fit into one larger plan for the field. Life-Net, Asia Lutheran Seminary, Friends of East Asia, 360 Now, WELS East Asia mission work, East Asia Lutheran Synod and Multi-Language Publications joined together under the umbrella of One East Asia Team. At least annually all the individual group leaders come together to look at the bigger picture, share insights and resources, and make plans to carry out their unique segment of it. Also brought into the dialogue are efforts happening in the States and Canada – like Chinese outreach work in Vancouver and digital outreach carried on from Minneapolis. During the year regular interaction takes place with each of the groups to collaborate on further development and carrying out the goals of the One East Asia Team.

At the beginning of November 2016, MLP sat together with the East Asia Team in Hong Kong as Larry Schlomer led them through the Traction training and the Vision/Traction Organizer (V/TO) long-range planning process. The discussions converged on the passion to reach the lost and to see discipleship multiplied through culturally appropriate ministry so that new churches can develop. We left with appreciation for our joint efforts and a renewed sense of urgency to fulfill our roles.

MLP-Asia is honored to be included as an integral part of the team to envision, plan and develop digital and print resources that help facilitate the direction or priorities of the field. We also hope to eventually provide a tool-kit for gathered groups. MLP-Asia also is working on the same type of partnership approach where it intersects with Asia Pacific Rim, South Asia, Hmong, Vietnamese and other global cross-over mission work.

Want another great example of this?  Check out Latin America with the 1LA team. It is another type of partnership with Multi-Language Publications that could be duplicated throughout our world mission efforts. To find out more, contact your MLP area coordinator or Nate Seiltz for more information.

 

 

 

MLP PRODUCTS

View a complete catalog of Multi-Language Publication’s products.


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Document software solutions for education

James Imaging Systems, a longstanding partner with ShopWELS, is offering Document Software Solutions for education.

Are your documents working for you, or is it the other way around? It is estimated that up to forty percent of the education sector’s activities are document driven. And many schools spend as much as ten percent of their funding on documents and related processes.

Document Software Solutions streamlines processes of your school with easier routing, reporting and tracking, improved mobile printing opportunities, converting paper to electronic editable formats, organizing documents, with security and version control.

Need help? A free, no obligation document management needs assessment is being offered by James Imaging Systems.

Learn more