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No man ever spoke like this man: Part 4

C. S. Lewis wrote that the idea that Jesus was only a great moral teacher is simply not true. Jesus made remarkable claims about himself. If Jesus is not what he said about himself, then he was either a lunatic or the very devil. To accept Jesus only as a great moral teacher is to reject him as Savior and Lord. There is no middle way.

Indeed, no man ever spoke like this man.

Theodore J. Hartwig

“I am the vine; you are the branches. If you remain in me and I in you, you will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing.”

The picture of vine and branches that Jesus paints in John 15:5 (NIV 2011) would be intimately familiar to the 12 disciples celebrating the Passover meal with their Lord in the upper room. Together with figs, olives, honey, wheat, and milk, grapes converted into wine were among the staple foods for people living in the Holy Land. Water that was safe to drink was not as available for them. Normally water had to be obtained from a well at the edge of town and was used most often for washing and purification ceremonies. Wine was safe to drink.

Vineyards and all the work that they required—especially the radical pruning of suckers and unproductive branches—would be a common sight in Jewish gardens and fields. A pitcher and cups for the wine would be on the table as part of the Passover celebration. In speaking of himself as the vine and his disciples as the branches, Jesus as master-teacher used something immediately at hand to visualize his lesson. In their mind’s eye, the disciples could see the cut-off suckers withering on the ground. But they would also visualize the good branches attached to the stout stem of the vine and heavy with bunches of grapes. Their land had good soil for grape production. Remember how the Israelite spies under Moses’ leadership returned from surveying their Promised Land. Two of them were carrying a single cluster of grapes on a pole between them (Numbers 13:23). When his disciples remained with Jesus and he with them, they would bear much fruit in the form of serving him and loving their fellow human beings.

But what can Jesus mean when he declares: “Apart from me you can do nothing”? This sounds like the height of exclusivity and arrogance. Are we helpless without Jesus? Certainly Christians and non-Christian people will pounce on this bold assertion. They assert that Jesus never made such a statement.

Perhaps we can uncover what he meant with a comparison from our personal lives. The comparison will be imperfect yet is not unbiblical. Jesus spoke of himself as the bridegroom, his disciples as the bride. Now think of a Christian husband and wife who are deeply in love. In the strength of their love, these Christian spouses, despite the sin that will mar their marriage, are of one mind and one heart. They want to be with each other, they want to serve each other, they willingly defer to each other and make sacrifices for each other, and they trust each other implicitly. For them, marriage means living together in mutual love. So strong is this bond in the marriage of Christian spouses who are deeply in love with each other!

Now apply this earthly bond to the one between Jesus and his disciples. They are attached to their Lord in a union far deeper and stronger than that between loving Christian husbands and wives. Jesus suffered and died for them so that they could live with him eternally. This love transcends all others. And in this setting, the statement Jesus made about himself as vine and his disciples as branches will have its natural and amazing outcome. Apart from Jesus, his disciples can do nothing. It means that Jesus will be the source, guide, and goal of their entire life and behavior.

I am the resurrection and the life. Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live, and everyone who lives and believes in me shall never die.”

Winged words! As is true of John’s entire gospel, the words of John 11:25,26 (ESV) soar like an eagle. They soar with authority. They soar with grace. They soar with comfort.

Jesus says, “I am the resurrection and the life.” Those words ring with an absolute authority. No other person in all history could say this of himself. But Jesus could say it because he became the trailblazer of all resurrections. His resurrection prepared the way for all other resurrections. Except for him, there would be no resurrection. So there is immense authority in his declaration that he is the resurrection and the life.

His words also soar with pure grace: “Whoever believes in me, though he die, yet shall he live.” Believing in him has happened without the tiniest cooperation on our part. It happened solely by grace, as a gift from God. His Word, speaking the unvarnished truth about sinful human nature, broke down the natural resistance in stubborn human hearts immersed in their own will, intellect, and pride. His Word comes to the rescue of crushed hearts with the sweet fragrance of forgiveness, peace, and love. The good news of Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God who has taken away the sin of the world, brings gracious comfort. This gospel takes possession of sinful hearts and creates new people who put their trust in Jesus. Despite all the death in this world, believers rejoice to know they will be with him eternally. All of this story is pure grace.

Jesus concludes with a statement bearing overwhelming comfort: “And everyone who lives and believes in me shall never die.” Herewith Jesus wipes out the natural grief that Christians will endure at the death of loved ones. When Lazarus died, Jesus gave this death its once-and-for-all description in life. For believers like Lazarus, Mary, and Martha, death is just a sleep. Therefore, Jesus declared that whoever lives and believes in him shall never die, shall not die eternally.

What are we to make of Jesus’ statements? Some liberal and unbelieving commentators assert that Jesus never made these claims about himself. They are either garbled recollections or inventions of his followers written 50 to 100 years later. To any casual reader, such a solution may seem persuasive. But only a persistent skeptic and slave to intellect would stick by this explanation. Jesus’ claims about himself are so unique, so extraordinary, so contrary to normal human experience that they could not have been garbled or dreamed up by his followers. Such “solutions” are simply and frankly unhistorical. These solutions are proposed by people who seek to avoid the claim of all of Scripture that Jesus is no mere human moralist or philosopher. He is the God of heaven come to earth for sinful humans. He became a Jew on earth for a time to claim us as his own and destroy sin and death. So, for us, Jesus must have the last word: “He who is not with me is against me” (Matthew 12:30).

Theodore Hartwig, professor emeritus at Martin Luther College, New Ulm, Minnesota, is a member at St. John, New Ulm.

This is the final article in a four-part series about how Jesus describes himself.

 

 

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Author:Theodore J. Hartwig
Volume 101, Number 12
Issue: December 2014

Copyrighted by WELS Forward in Christ © 2018
Forward in Christ grants permission for any original article (not a reprint) to be printed for use in a WELS church, school, or organization, provided that it is distributed free and indicate Forward in Christ as the source. Images may not be reproduced except in the context of its article. Contact us

 

No Man ever spoke like this man

The gospel of Jesus Christ does not conform to human reason and senses. The four authentic records of Jesus’ life and teaching—the gospels—together with the writings of his apostles that accompany those records breathe the spirit of authentic witnesses. They wrote about what they saw and heard rather than what they began to think and believe through the passage of time. All of these are so clear and natural. But human reason and scientific methodology wreak havoc with the gospel and put the lie to whatever stupendous claims Jesus made about himself. The words Jesus spoke of himself no other great religious teacher in all history ever spoke. INDEED, NO MAN EVER SPOKE LIKE THIS MAN.

Theodore J. Hartwig

“TRULY, TRULY, I SAY TO YOU, UNLESS YOU EAT THE FLESH OF THE SON OF MAN AND DRINK HIS BLOOD, YOU HAVE NO LIFE IN YOU.”

After Jesus had fed the five thousand, the crowds tried to make him their king. He resisted and withdrew into the hills. The disciples headed to Capernaum by boat. During the night, Jesus walked on the water and joined them in their boat. Together they all returned to Capernaum. But the people were determined to keep on trying to make him king. They took to their own boats, made their way across the sea, and found Jesus in Capernaum.

Jesus reproached them for seeking him to feed them with a free lunch and not seeking him for the more important food he could give them that endures to eternal life. They were still thinking of the bread they ate the day before and somehow thought that Jesus would supply them with bread like Moses gave their ancestors manna in the wilderness. They grumbled when Jesus claimed to be the bread of life. He told them clearly, “I am the living bread that came down from heaven. If anyone eats of this bread, he will live forever” (John 6:51 ESV).

Reason and senses closed their minds to the words Jesus spoke. They could see only a human being of flesh and blood talking with them. Then Jesus made a more profound statement about himself. “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever feeds on my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life” (John 6:54 ESV).

Jesus claimed he was greater than Moses and greater than the bread Moses gave in the desert. Manna sustained the Israelites’ lives; Jesus gives eternal life. They did not understand.

What was so difficult? Faith in Jesus never makes sense to the human heart. Jesus chose his words very carefully to break down that opposition and pierce their hearts with the knowledge of the truth. Therefore he spoke of eating his flesh and drinking his blood. His flesh and blood are not phantom or spiritual; they are real flesh and real blood. Yet this man, contrary to what they saw, came down from heaven; he is also true God. The gospel of Jesus Christ is gospel only with this truth that he is both God and man. And this alone has the power to bring human hearts, without their cooperation, to saving faith.

Jesus, with his message of eating his flesh and drinking his blood, powerfully proclaims that believing in him means belonging to him completely. It means that he is ours and we are his. It means that he dwells in us and we in him. And so it assures believers that Jesus will be with them and will raise them from the dead to live with him forever. Just as he said, “Everyone who looks on the Son and believes in him should have eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day” (John 6:40 ESV).

“ALL AUTHORITY IN HEAVEN AND ON EARTH HAVE BEEN GIVEN TO ME”

When Jesus says that all authority in heaven and earth has been given him, a person may wonder whether Jesus did not always have this authority. Surely, as the Son of God he had all authority from eternity. This brings us face to face with the second great mystery of our Christian faith. Its first mystery is that we believe that Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are three persons, yet one God. We call it the article of the Trinity.

The second great mystery is that Jesus Christ is the Son of God fully divine and the son of Mary fully human, yet a single person, not two Christs but one Christ. Because he is a single person, we confess that wherever he is as the Son of God, he is also naturally there as the son of Mary. Therefore we also believe, teach, and confess that when he suffered and died on the cross, the single person of Jesus Christ, God and man, suffered and died.

There is one more truth to this mystery. Jesus said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me” (Matthew 28:18).

He possessed the authority of God’s Son from eternity. Then throughout his short life on earth, he retained all authority as God’s Son, but he kept it hidden and used it only when he wanted to use it. But all of this changed with his resurrection. Then his glory was evident, not only as the Son of God but also as Mary’s son. Though his appearance as a human being remained unchanged, he revealed the full glory and majesty of God because he was one person.

Because these truths about the person of Jesus Christ are mysteries, they may seem far removed from living our normal Christian lives as his disciples. We have read and heard these truths in Bible passages and have heard and spoken them in our Christian worship, but perhaps we weren’t fully aware of their far-ranging significance and comfort.

Because Jesus Christ, God and man, remains one person, he spoke of all authority in heaven and on earth being given to him. He spoke to his disciples of all times, “to the end of the age” of his constant presence as they always knew him. He will be with them not only as God but also as a human being, who had spoken to them, who had tasted their griefs and sorrows, and who sympathizes with his followers because he is still our flesh-and-blood brother.

This man who in his hidden divine majesty fed over five thousand people with a few loaves and fishes can also do what he promises in the Supper he gave us. In, with, and under real bread and wine he can give us his real body and blood. This is as certain and true as his Word, his promises, and his resurrection from the dead are true. As with all that Jesus is and taught, the mystery that he is God and man in one person has the goal of comforting his disciples.

Theodore Hartwig, professor emeritus at Martin Luther College, New Ulm, Minnesota, is a member at St. John, New Ulm.

This is the third article in a four-part series about how Jesus describes himself.

 

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Author: Theodore J. Hartwig
Volume 101, Number 11
Issue: November 2014

Copyrighted by WELS Forward in Christ © 2018
Forward in Christ grants permission for any original article (not a reprint) to be printed for use in a WELS church, school, or organization, provided that it is distributed free and indicate Forward in Christ as the source. Images may not be reproduced except in the context of its article. Contact us

 

No man ever spoke like this man: Part 2

What Jesus said about himself makes him is more than a great human teacher. By his words he claims to be God and Lord. Unbelievers and naysayers, to be sure, have written off whatever words they think Jesus actually spoke. They conclude that those words are simply garbled recollections or inventions added by his followers 50 to 100 years later. They become victims of their own human intellect and their scientific method of Bible dissection. But the words Jesus spoke of himself no other great religious teacher in all history ever spoke. Indeed, no man ever spoke like this man.

Theodore J. Hartwig

“CAN ANY OF YOU PROVE ME GUILTY OF SIN? IF I AM TELLING THE TRUTH, WHY DON’T YOU BELIEVE ME?”

Jesus spoke this extraordinary statement in John 8:46 while debating with the Jews in Jerusalem. Jesus’ question must have boggled the minds of all the people disputing with him. How could he, a mere man, dare to claim he was without sin as if he were God? They had seen his power and were familiar with his miracles, but outward signs and wonders do not change hearts. Only the still, small voice of the gospel converts and creates new hearts.

Peter and his companions knew who Jesus was. They had experienced the miracles of Jesus probably more than anyone. They had just served as waiters when Jesus fed the five thousand with five loaves and two fish. When many of these people the next day deserted Jesus for his hard teachings, Jesus then asked the Twelve, “You do not want to leave too, do you?” Peter made his beautiful confession: “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life. We believe and know that you are the Holy One of God” (John 6:67-69). Peter did not name miracles as the cause for his faith. No, it was the power of Jesus’ words, which moved him to call this man of human flesh and blood the Holy One of God.

And what about doubting Thomas? Jesus appeared to Thomas and the disciples the week after his resurrection and removed Thomas’ doubts. But he also directed Thomas and the others about faith. “Because you have seen me, you have believed; blessed are those who have not seen and yet have believed” (John 20:29). Seeing can be a mind-persuasive obstruction to faith. People saw Jesus in the flesh, spoke with him, ate with him, witnessed his miracles, saw a human person like themselves. But except for the few who listened to and took his words to heart, many would reject him. They would respond, “We are not stoning you for any of these [great miracles] . . . but for blasphemy, because you, a mere man, claim to be God” (John 10:33). So these people understood Jesus clearly. They understood his stupendous self-identifications. But what their ears heard did not match what their eyes saw. So they rejected him.

The same happened at his trial before the Jewish high court. When the high priest put Jesus under oath and demanded of him, “I charge you under oath by the living God: Tell us if you are the Christ, the Son of God.” Jesus made his good confession: “Yes, it is as you say.” To which the high priest responded: “He has spoken blasphemy!” (Matthew 26:63-65).

This is how it has been, how it is, and how it always will be when Jesus occupies people’s thoughts and conversation. He confronts us with an either-or. Those not with him are against him. There is no middle ground. To be with him is to respect, to believe, to rejoice, and to be comforted by his astounding question: Can any of you prove me guilty of sin?

“I TELL YOU THE TRUTH, BEFORE ABRAHAM WAS BORN, I AM”

John’s gospel records many disputes Jesus had in Jerusalem with the Jewish religious leaders. In one, Jesus told them that their father Abraham rejoiced at the thought of seeing the day when he would leave his Father and come to earth. Indeed, in faith Abraham saw that future day as if it had already happened, and he rejoiced. The Jewish leaders responded, “You are not yet fifty years old . . . and you have seen Abraham!” And the surprising answer of Jesus? “I tell you the truth, . . . before Abraham was born, I am!” (John 8:58).

Jesus’ words in the book of Revelation seem to have a similar ring. There he tells John: “I am the Alpha and the Omega [the First and the Last] . . . who is, and who was, and who is to come, the Almighty” (1:8).

Jesus is. Amid all the ongoing tumults fomented by wars, hatreds, human monsters, and rampant immorality in this world, Jesus will not relinquish his office as overseer. “My Father is always at his work to this very day, and I, too, am working,” he told the Jewish leaders (John 5:17). All things are under his care and control. He does not take his gift of liberty away from people, but he executes his work of preservation by keeping his oversight within bounds, normally through good civil government and capable human leaders. The Lord remains in charge. He is at his work in the present and everywhere.

Jesus was. All that has happened in the past, all history, occurred under his oversight because it is all His Story. The Lord Jesus stands at the center of history, and only in this light does one find the key to history. The apostle Paul expressed history’s meaning when he wrote that history is “to bring all things in heaven and on earth together under one head, even Christ” (Ephesians 1:10).

Jesus is to come. He is Lord of the future. Revelation tells the story of the future of the world and the church until the Lord’s return at the end of this age. Since that future is beyond human experience, its story is couched in the language of symbols and pictures. It all points to the truth of Jesus.

Jesus identifies himself as “I Am” to the Jewish leaders. These men knew that Jesus was referring to what God said to their hero Moses from the burning bush on Mt. Horeb: “I AM WHO I AM. . . . This is my name forever, the name I am to be remembered from generation to generation” (Exodus 3:14,15).

And here in front of these Jews, this man, Jesus of Nazareth, dared to call himself “I Am.” He dared to put himself on the same level with God. What blasphemy to their minds! It was bound to inflame their murderous hatred and move them to take up stones to stone him.

These Jews were scandalized by Jesus’ words because they regarded him only on the basis of their reason and senses. They saw only a man of flesh and blood, a human being like themselves. The tragic failure with these Jews lay in their refusal to listen to and taking seriously the word Jesus taught. His Word, with its innate power, did not pierce their hearts. They shrugged it off, rejected it, and so they never came to faith. They would not and could not believe that this man of flesh and blood was also the very God.

The words of Jesus have penetrated our hearts. We believe him to be true God and true man—Savior and Lord.

Theodore Hartwig, professor emeritus at Martin Luther College, New Ulm, Minnesota, is a member at St. John, New Ulm.

This is the second article in a four-part series about how Jesus describes himself.

 

SUBMIT YOUR STORY

Do you have a manuscript, idea, or story from your own life you’d like to share for use in Forward in Christ or on wels.net? Use our online form to share it to our editorial office for consideration.

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Get inspirational stories, spiritual help, and synod news from  Forward in Christ every month. Print and digital subscriptions are available from Northwestern Publishing House.

 

Author: Theodore Hartwig
Volume 101, Number 10
Issue: October 2014

Copyrighted by WELS Forward in Christ © 2018
Forward in Christ grants permission for any original article (not a reprint) to be printed for use in a WELS church, school, or organization, provided that it is distributed free and indicate Forward in Christ as the source. Images may not be reproduced except in the context of its article. Contact us

 

No man ever spoke like this man Part: 1

No man ever spoke like this man

Great moral teacher or Savior? Jesus’ claims about himself make him more than a moral teacher. 

Theodore J. Hartwig

C. S. Lewis, the British teacher at Oxford and Cambridge, was a prominent defender of the Christian faith. He first came to the attention of Americans with the publication of his satirical Screwtape Letters in 1942. The book featured letters of a senior devil, Screwtape, giving advice to his protégé, Wormword, on proper methods for encouraging sin and undermining Christian faith.

In another work, Mere Christianity, Lewis makes a case that Jesus was exactly who he said he was and could be no other. In its best known passage he writes:

I am trying here to prevent anyone saying the really foolish thing that people often say about Him: “I am ready to accept Jesus as a really great moral teacher, but I don’t accept His claim to be God.” That is the one thing we must not say. A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would rather be a lunatic—or else He would be the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God: or else a madman or something worse. You can shut Him up for a fool, you can spit at him and call him a demon; or you can fall at his feet and call Him God and Lord. But let us not come with any patronising [sic] nonsense about his being a great human teacher. He has not let that open to us. In the end, to receive Jesus as nothing more than a great moral teacher is to reject Him as your Savior and Lord; it is to receive a Jesus of your own devising and imagination. He did not just come to teach you and improve you, but to save you from your sins (p. 45).

Lewis’s words ring with the same stark either-or message of Jesus. “He who is not with me,” Jesus declared, “is against me, and he who does not gather with me scatters” (Matthew 12:30). Jesus makes a startling claim. So Lewis observed that Jesus is not just a man who is merely a great teacher because he would not say the sort of things Jesus said.

We note that also in what people thought of Jesus. “The crowds were amazed at his teaching, because he taught as one who had authority, and not as their teachers of the law” (Matthew 7:28,29). Even the palace officers confirmed this. The chief priests and Pharisees had sent them to arrest Jesus in the temple. But they returned from their assignment without Jesus and told the men who sent them: “No one ever spoke like this man” (John 7:46 ESV)!

Let’s explore what Jesus said about himself and discover that he is more than a great human teacher. He is God and Lord. Unbelievers and naysayers, to be sure, have written off whatever words they think Jesus actually spoke. They conclude that those words are simply garbled recollections or inventions added by his followers 50 to 100 years later. They become victims of their own human intellect and their scientific method of Bible dissection. But the words Jesus spoke of himself no other great religious teacher in all history ever spoke.

Indeed, no man ever spoke like this man.

“I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.”

The Gospel of St. John records seven extraordinary claims Jesus makes about himself. They are known as the “I Am’s.”

Among the most beloved are his words to Martha at her brother Lazarus’s death. Jesus claims he is the resurrection and the life (John 11:25).

Another is the statement spoken to his disciples just before his suffering and death. They were troubled and confused. How could they follow him once he was gone? Jesus assured them, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me” (John 14:6).

It’s a mind-boggling claim, not at all popular in our religiously permissive society. When Jesus describes himself as the way, bear in mind that his way toward eternal life is different from every other. All others ways strive to reach eternal life by natural human thought and wisdom. They all rely, in one way or another, on human effort. But other ways will be not only misleading but illusory. When Jesus is the way, then the means of reaching its goal is absolutely certain. It rests on nothing human but solely on what Jesus has done.

Jesus next describes himself as the truth. Remember the conversation between Jesus and Pilate. When Pilate asked whether Jesus was a king, he answered: “My kingdom is not of this world. . . . For this reason I was born, and for this I came into the world, to testify to the truth. Everyone on the side of truth listens to me.” To which Pilate responded, “What is truth?” (John 18:36-38). The quest for truth has been ceaseless. From antiquity to the present, people have sought to find the truth. But they do not find it outside of Jesus. He is the eternal Word of God—the truth—who became a humanbeing. For us and our salvation he suffered on the cross, died, and on the third day rose from death to assure his followers of their resurrection and eternal life.

Finally, Jesus describes himself as the life. What first comes to mind are Jesus’ words that “whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life” (John 3:16). At this place, however, Jesus seems to speak about the life of his followers in this present world. At another place, Jesus added this meaningful postscript to the truth: “[It] will set you free” (John 8:32). Truth creates life that is freely eager and ready to serve. It’s a new life within. The truth of Jesus fills the hearts of his followers not only with gratitude for setting them free from sin but also with hope of eternal life. Then the heart has a glorious freedom of willing obedience to the Savior’s commands. Because he lives in believers, they strive to live like him.

Because Jesus is the way, the truth, and the life, it must follow that no one comes to the Father except through him. The way of Jesus is unique, discounting all human effort to reach its destination. The truth of Jesus is unique, proclaiming a message that is not a human invention but a proclamation of God—the gospel. The life of Jesus is unique in its power to change natural, self-centered human hearts to be different and other-centered. Because Jesus is this way, this truth, and this life, it must follow that no one comes to his Father except through him.

Theodore Hartwig, professor emeritus at Martin Luther College, New Ulm, Minnesota, is a member at St. John, New Ulm.

This is the first article in a four-part series about how Jesus describes himself.

 

SUBMIT YOUR STORY

Do you have a manuscript, idea, or story from your own life you’d like to share for use in Forward in Christ or on wels.net? Use our online form to share it to our editorial office for consideration.

SUBSCRIBE TO FORWARD IN CHRIST

Get inspirational stories, spiritual help, and synod news from  Forward in Christ every month. Print and digital subscriptions are available from Northwestern Publishing House.

 

Author: Theodore J. Hartwig
Volume 101, Number 9
Issue: September 2014

Copyrighted by WELS Forward in Christ © 2018
Forward in Christ grants permission for any original article (not a reprint) to be printed for use in a WELS church, school, or organization, provided that it is distributed free and indicate Forward in Christ as the source. Images may not be reproduced except in the context of its article. Contact us

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