Manger and Cross – Week of December 23, 2019

Manger and Cross – Week of December 23, 2019


While they were there, the time came for the baby to be born, and she gave birth to her firstborn, a son. She wrapped him in cloths and placed him in a manger, because there was no guest room available for them.

Luke 2:6-7



How could the King of Kings sleep in a manger (a feeding trough for animals)? How could the creator of the world find no room in an inn? How could the infinite, all-knowing, and all-powerful God allow himself to be born in such lowly circumstances? Love. That’s why.

How could an adult with a college degree take little children (not their own) to the bathroom? How could a grown person be so consumed with slime, playdough, and crayons? How could sophisticated, well-educated, and articulate adults allow themselves to be in such a position for not great pay? Love. That’s why.

In order to understand the birth of Christ you have to look beyond the hill of Judaea (Bethlehem) to Mount Calvary. In order to truly understand this Christmas event you have to look beyond the wood of the manger to the wood of the cross. This little boy came to die. God came to die. Sins needed to be paid for so God came to pay the price. That’s why he is so lowly. Love. That’s why.

In order to understand your life’s work in the home, in the school, and in the world, you need to look past everything to the cross. It’s all for love, that’s why. Love that serves in order to point others to the cross where you have found your Savior’s love. That’s why you clean up those disgusting messes. That’s why you painstakingly laminate an endless amount of paper. Love. That’s why.

It doesn’t always feel like it. It can feel more like burden. It can feel like a cross. And it is. God works his love in the world through you. So even when there are days when you don’t feel very loving or patient or calm or appreciated or valued or loved yourself, God still works his love through you. So why do you do it all? Love. That’s why. Because God loves you and you will do whatever it takes to show that love to those little ones in your care.



Prayer:
Dear Savior, help us to look past the manger to the cross. Here we see a simple and ugly thing used for the ultimate good, our forgiveness. Remind us in the grind of our own lives that you still work your love through us to others. Amen.



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Patience is a Gift from God – Week of December 16, 2019

Patience is a Gift from God – Week of December 16, 2019


Be patient, then, brothers and sisters, until the Lord’s coming. See how the farmer waits for the land to yield its valuable crop, patiently waiting for the autumn and spring rains. You too, be patient and stand firm, because the Lord’s coming is near. Don’t grumble against one another, brothers and sisters, or you will be judged. The Judge is standing at the door!

James 5:7-9



The Lord’s coming is near. So we are to be patient like a farmer. Like a farmer we plant and we wait but we are sure of a harvest. Do you not plant the seed of God’s words into the hearts of little ones every day? Of course you do. Do you have to wait? Yes. But you can be sure of this harvest. God’s Word does not return to him empty handed (Isa 55:10).

We wait in great expectation for the Lord’s return where he too will gather a harvest, a harvest of souls. When you plant the seed of God’s Word you are a part of this process. You are the hand of God. And just as the farmer steps away and lets nature do its thing so we step away (in a way) and watch the Spirit do his work. Sure, we till and fertilize, we weed and we tend but it is the Spirit that creates faith. So be patient. The work will get done. God’s work will get done. He will make sure of that.

Easier said than done, right? Patience is not a virtue we possess by ourselves. (Ask any farmer waiting for rain!) Patience is worked in us by a gracious God. He makes us patient. So pray for patience. God will provide what you need. He always has. In fact, whatever God demands of us, he gives to us in Christ. He says, “Be perfect!” and then gives us the righteousness of Christ that covers all of our un-righteous acts. He says, “Stop doubting and believe!” and then gives us the faith to believe. In the reading from James he says “Be patient.” So we ask for what he commands and he gives it to us.

It might not always look like virtuous patience on our part but so what? Your patience is not about you but about your students and your family. He will give it to you. He has not let us down yet. It won’t be perfect because we will mess it up, but we are forgiven and so are the ones that we serve.



Prayer:
God, grant us a rich measure of patience not so that we can be virtuous but for the love of those we serve. Forgive us when we are impatient and rest us in your promises of Christ’s return in glory. Amen.



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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God’s Word Has Creative Power – Week of December 9, 2019

God’s Word Has Creative Power – Week of December 9, 2019


For everything that was written in the past was written to teach us, so that through the endurance taught in the Scriptures and the encouragement they provide we might have hope. May the God who gives endurance and encouragement give you the same attitude of mind toward each other that Christ Jesus had, so that with one mind and one voice you may glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Romans 15:4-6



God’s words are for your encouragement. That is why they were written. That’s why the Holy Spirit inspired them. For you. Just think about that. The Father who speaks words, the Spirit who inspires words, the Son who is the Word, are all for you. For you.
God’s word also has power. In the beginning of St. Paul’s letter he calls the gospel “the power of God” (Rom 1:16). In particular, God’s Word has creative power. He said “Let there be light” and there was light. His words of forgiveness actually forgive sins (John 20:23). His words create faith (Rom 10:17) in dead hearts.

Let’s put those two things together: The power of God’s words and the fact that these words are for you. From the beginning of time God thought about you. “She needs to hear this message. He needs to be taught this lesson. She is going to have a rough day on December 29th 2019 so I want her to hear this gospel right now. He is going to get sick when he is 74 and I want him at peace. And my words will get the job done because my words have power.”

He knows. He knows you. He knows your classroom. He knows your students. He knows their parents. He knows. And his words are for them and you. So that you may have hope. A hope in Christ. Your sins are forgiven. Your work matters. Heaven is secure. Here are God’s words for your encouragement. They were written for you.



Prayer:
Jesus Christ, your life and death have granted us eternal security in the forgiveness of sins and life everlasting. Continue to encourage us and our students with these powerful words. Amen.



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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We Do Not Know When The End Will Come and That Is a Good Thing! – Week of December 2, 2019

We Do Not Know When The End Will Come and That Is a Good Thing! – Week of December 2, 2019


Therefore keep watch, because you do not know on what day your Lord will come. But understand this: If the owner of the house had known at what time of night the thief was coming, he would have kept watch and would not have let his house be broken into. So you also must be ready, because the Son of Man will come at an hour when you do not expect him.

Matthew 24:42-44



Can you imagine how awful it would be to know the exact date of the last day? Humans would scramble to get in as much pleasure as they could in their final moments. All the money would be taken out of the banks. Who would go to the doctor? Why have schools? Most people would be trying to travel to see friends and family or famous sites around the world. But what pilot would give up his final hours taking an airplane full of people to Paris? I suppose churches would be filled and that would be a good thing but still, I am thankful the Father has kept this date to himself. This particular ignorance is a gift from God.

I wonder if the Father will have the same urgency as we would as the final day approaches? When the clock gets close to midnight will he speed up the spread of his gospel message? The truth is he has. Maybe we do not always see the results but he is urgent, as urgent as he always was from the beginning.

This is the message of Matthew 24. He wants you to have the same urgency as he does but spare you the burden of knowing exactly when the end will arrive. So he describes Christ’s return as a thief in the night. Always be prepared. Be urgent in your work. And yet, be still. Do not be anxious. Go about your work in peace. If tomorrow is the end. Good. Heaven awaits. If we have another hundred or thousand or ten-thousand years, that is okay too. He is in charge. So be ready but not anxious.

You teach with this calmness and peace (at least on good days). You are urgent for your little ones. This is important! But there is a calm about you. A peace that springs from Christ who has the beginning, the end, and everything in between under control. So keep watch but be still.



Prayer:
Dear Heavenly Father, your timetable is not our timetable. Grant us peace to go about our days with the urgency of the last days but also with the calmness that springs from the peace of Christ. Amen.



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Christ the King – Christ’s Glorious Kingdom – Week of November 25, 2019

Christ the King – Christ’s Glorious Kingdom – Week of November 25, 2019


The people stood watching, and the rulers even sneered at him. They said, ‘He saved others; let him save himself if he is God’s Messiah, the Chosen.’ The soldiers also came up and mocked him. They offered him wine vinegar and said, ‘If you are the king of the Jews, save yourself.’

There was written notice above him, which read: THIS IS THE KING OF THE JEWS. One of criminals who hung there hurled insults at him: ‘Aren’t you the Messiah? Save yourself and us.’

But the other criminal rebuked him. ‘Don’t you fear God’, he said, ‘since you are under the same sentence? We are punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve. But this man has done nothing wrong.’

Then he said, ‘Jesus remember me when you come into your kingdom.’

Jesus answered him, ‘Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.’

Luke 23:35-43



Welcome home. What do these words mean to you when you hear the words? Are you thinking of coming home after a vacation to the comfort of your home? Perhaps these words are said to you when you visit your parents after you have moved out of their home? Maybe it is as simple as after a long day when you pull in the garage, you mutter these words to yourself. There is a sense of comfort in these words. Home! A special place of belonging and with comfort and peace.

As Jesus was hanging on the cross on Good Friday, many things were happening around him. Some were mourning his pain and imminent death. Others were laughing and hurling insults at Jesus as he was suffering.

Jesus hung on the middle cross. The Bible says one criminal hung to his right and one to his left. One of the criminals mocked Jesus and asked for a miracle. The criminal wondered if Jesus is truly the Savior why he didn’t save himself and them as well.

The other criminal had more of a humble approach on the cross. He even realized that they were being punished fairly, but Jesus had done nothing to deserve the punishment of dying on the cross. He even asked Jesus to have pity on him and remember him when Jesus enters his kingdom.

Jesus turned to the criminal and said, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.” What amazing words! Can you imagine the shock of the criminal as Jesus gave him this comfort? Jesus is welcoming him into paradise, his eternal home!

One day Jesus will say to us too, welcome home!



Thought to Ponder: Take time to pause today and marvel at the promise Jesus gives to us, just like the thief on the cross, “Today you will be with me in paradise”

Prayer:
Jesus sinners does receive. Even I have been forgiven.
And when I this earth must leave, I shall find an open heaven.
Dying, still to him I cleave—Jesus sinners does receive. Amen
Christian Worship 304:7



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Saints Triumphant – An Everlasting Family – Week of November 18, 2019

Saints Triumphant – An Everlasting Family – Week of November 18, 2019


Then I heard a voice from heaven say, ‘Write this: Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from now on’. Yes, says the Spirit, they will rest from their labor, for their deeds will follow them.

Revelation 14:13



Funeral. The very thought of the word can bring an enormous amount of sadness and grief! Scenes from funerals often replay through the mind and words that are spoken at a funeral are heard over and over again in the days following the funeral.

A few months ago, I attended a funeral for a friend in the congregation whose elderly mother passed away. Just two weeks before that funeral the congregation gathered together for the funeral of the same lady’s husband. That is an overwhelming amount of loss for a person in a matter of two weeks. It is hard to even know how to comfort the grieving family.

As I was sitting in the pew before the service began, I was reminiscing how the family was always greeting people as they walked through the doors of the church. Both the mother and husband played instrumental roles on the outreach team. There wasn’t a potluck where I didn’t see both of them engaging in preparations. They made an effort to always be present at pre-k events at the church to build relationships with prospects. I sat in the pew marveling at the amazing Christian servant attitude they both displayed and modeled for the whole congregation, and me personally.

The passage that came into my mind as the funeral service began was Revelation 14:13, “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from now on. Yes, says the Spirit, they will rest from their labor, for their deeds will follow them.” Ahh, this verse is the perfect Bible passage for a grieving family!

Most Bible scholars agree that the voice heard from heaven is Jesus himself. Jesus is promising that those who die in the Lord are blessed, they receive the joy of eternal life. What a comfort to those left behind! The loved one is blessed by Jesus and is in the comfort and peace of heaven. Heaven is a place of rest: a place where there is no pain, suffering, and sin. Earthly labors are over and the Spirit promises rest for those who die in the Lord.

All of the deeds of a person will not go unnoticed. The deeds do not get a person into heaven, but rather serve as evidence of living a life for Jesus, a life now complete with eternal life in heaven with all believers.



Prayer: Asleep in Jesus! Blessed sleep,
From which none ever wakes to weep,
A calm and undisturbed repose,
Unbroken by the last of foes. Amen
Christian Worship 605:1



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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The Last Judgement – Week of November 11, 2019

The Last Judgement – Week of November 11, 2019


All this is evidence that God’s judgment is right, and as a result you will be counted worthy of the kingdom of God, for which you are suffering. God is just: He will pay back trouble to those who trouble you and give relief to you who are troubled, and to us as well. This will happen when the Lord Jesus is revealed from heaven in blazing fire with his powerful angels.

2 Thessalonians 1:5-7



Have you ever just had one of “those” days, a day when nothing seemed to go right? Maybe it was day filled with trials. Maybe it was a day when you received bad news from a loved one. Maybe it was a day where you felt persecuted for proudly talking about your faith and the Good News of Gospel. It is safe to assume that the answer to this question is a yes from all people. There are days when things do not go as planned, days when chaos overtakes the day, and days when there are trials.

When trials and persecutions come, it is easy to search for answers as to why there is suffering. Where is God? Why is God letting suffering happen? Did we do something to deserve the suffering? Christians can easily begin to think that suffering is a judgement of sinning. However, 2 Thessalonians 1:5 states, “All this is evidence that God’s judgement is right, and as a result you will be counted worthy of the kingdom of God, for which you are suffering”. The comfort is that suffering happens because we are counted worthy of the kingdom of God. Suffering and trials are evidence that we are children of God.

The remainder of the passage is describing God’s judgement on the Last Day, Judgement Day. This will be a day when Jesus comes in full glory and the final judgement will take place. The promise is that everyone who suffered, especially for being a Christian, will receive the comfort of eternal life in heaven where there is no more suffering. Christians will receive “relief” from earthly sufferings.

Sufferings and trials can be difficult in the moment. It may seem like the sufferings will not end. Throughout the suffering and trials, cling to the promise of the Savior-salvation and eternal life! Any earthly suffering is temporary, but the peace of heaven will last for an eternity.



Thought to Ponder: God is just. God is judge. We have peace knowing what Jesus has done for us. There is an urgency to share God’s message of grace with those who do not have faith. Since there is a sense of urgency in sharing the Gospel, what can you intentionally do this week to share the Word with someone?

Prayer: To me he spoke, “Hold fast to me- I am your rock and castle.
Your ransom I myself will be; For you I strive and wrestle.
For I am yours, your friend divine, and evermore you shall be mine;
The foe shall not divide us.” Amen
Christian Worship 377:7



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Reformation – Justified by Faith – Week of November 4, 2019

Reformation – Justified by Faith – Week of November 4, 2019


For we maintain that a person is justified by faith apart from the works of the law.

Romans 3:28



Silence falls across the courtroom as the verdict is being read. Guilty, the defendant is found guilty! From the start of the trial, the evidence and questioning foreshadowed the guilty verdict. Countless hours were spent in court showing the laundry list of wrongs that this defendant had committed. Judgement is finalized, the defendant will be punished for his crimes.

Just as the defendant is being led out of the courtroom to be punished, the judge bangs the gavel and hands the defendant a piece of paper that reads, “PAID IN FULL”. How could this be? The judge knows full well that the defendant is guilty and has all the evidence stacked on courtroom table. The judge looks past the stack of evidence and explains to the defendant that his punishment is paid in full and the defendant is free. The courtroom is now filled with surprise and amazement.

This courtroom scene is a beautiful and touching picture of the meaning of justification. To be justified is to be forgiven and accepted into right standing, to be righteous in God’s sight, to be declared not guilty.

You and I are the guilty defendant in this scene. Countless hours are spent with our never-ending list of sins. The fact is we are sinful and deserve to be punished for our sins! We stand condemned before God our judge. There is no amount of good works that can be done to fulfill the sentencing of the guilty verdict.

The comfort is, just when we feel hopeless and in despair, God, the judge, bangs his gavel and declares us “NOT GUILTY”. God looks at the stack of evidence, and all he sees what Jesus has done for us! The punishment of sin and death has been paid in full through Jesus suffering, death, and resurrection! There is nothing left to be done, salvation is complete!



Prayer: By grace God’s Son, our only Savior, came down to earth to bear our sin. Was it because of your own merit that Jesus dies your soul to win? No, it was grace and grace alone that brought him from his heavenly throne. Amen.
Christian Worship 384:2



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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If Only… – Week of October 28, 2019

If Only… – Week of October 28, 2019


Your will be done.

Matthew 6:10



If only. Do you ever find yourself pondering these two little words? “If only I could get a bit more sleep.” “If only I was able to pay off the bills just once.” “If only we had a few more students or another staff member.” “If only I had a new vehicle so I wouldn’t have to worry about the next inevitable repair bill.” “If only God would take away my headaches or cancer or fatigue.” “If only we knew what day the licensing rep would be dropping in for an inspection.” “If only God would answer my prayer the way I’ve asked.” If only.

There are a couple of places that the words, “Your will be done” are spoken in the Bible. Two that come to mind are when Jesus teaches his disciples and us, the Lord’s prayer. Another time is when Jesus is praying in the Garden of Gethsemane, shortly before his arrest and crucifixion. Wouldn’t we expect that Jesus wouldn’t even need to say those words? Wouldn’t God automatically respond to his own Son’s prayer with a “yes?” No. God didn’t for Jesus, and he doesn’t always for us. And we are left to ask why.

Each time we pray, our words are eagerly heard by the God who made the universe, who made each of us. His love and care for us extends beyond seeing us as a mere creation. He loves us deeply, deeper than any love than any parent for their child. More than the parent anticipating their child coming home, God wants each one of his creations to spend every day of eternity in his home, in heaven. That love sent God’s only Son, Jesus, to the cross, the grave, and then to rise on Easter morning. A God who loves us that much, truly wants only what is best for us. When we pray, “Your will be done,” we are making a statement of faith that recognizes that we may not see the big picture for our lives, but our God does. We know what we want, but God knows what is best for us.

Sometimes our prayers are hard. We feel the weight of our burdens and can be thinking, if only God will answer this prayer the way that I hope, all will be fine. “Your will be done.” What is God’s will? What are we saying when we pray these words? God’s will is that his name is made holy and that all would know and believe in him. His will is grounded in a deep love for us. More than just asking God’s will to be done, we are also asking that the Lord bring our will into harmony with his good and gracious will. We can trust his will for us and boldly pray that he would bless and encourage us as we face the challenges of life. We can pray that he will help us to use each of our blessings and challenges as a way to give glory to him for all he has done for us.

The most important “if only” in our lives has already been done. We have forgiveness and peace with God because of Jesus. The heartaches and stresses of life continue but we can face them with courage and with confidence knowing that God’s will is for our good and that whether the answer to our prayer is a yes or a no, he is with us. “Your will be done, indeed!” We wouldn’t want it any other way! To Him be the Glory!



Prayer: Dear Lord, give me confidence and comfort in prayer trusting that your will for me and those I love is good and gracious and founded in your love. In your name I pray. Amen



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Welcome Home – Now What? – Week of October 21, 2019

Welcome Home – Now What? – Week of October 21, 2019


Then Jesus told them this parable: “Suppose one of you has a hundred sheep and loses one of them. Doesn’t he leave the ninety-nine in the open country and goes after the lost sheep until he finds it? And when he finds it, he joyfully puts it on his shoulders and goes home. Then he calls his friends and neighbors together and says, ‘Rejoice with me; I have found my lost sheep.’ I tell you that in the same way there will be more rejoicing in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who do not need to repent.

Luke 15: 3-7



Can you imagine being in charge of one hundred sheep? The likelihood for one or more to wander off seems pretty high. Think for a minute about what the shepherd in our text does. He leaves ninety-nine sheep in the open country and goes after the one lost one. What devotion he has to that one lost sheep in addition to the others! Once he finds that wayward sheep, he doesn’t herd it back to the flock. “He joyfully puts it on his shoulders and goes home.” He’s so excited that he lovingly carries that rogue sheep back to join the others. And it doesn’t stop there. He invites friends and neighbors to celebrate with him. What selfless, overwhelming love!

In the past several devotions, we’ve talked about identifying someone you know who has strayed from the Word. We’ve talked about reconnecting with them and encouraging them to come home to their church and even more, to their Savior. Hopefully you’ve had an opportunity to do so and a conversation is beginning. You may hear those heartfelt words of gratitude that you cared enough to reach out. What a blessing to join in thanking God for this incredible blessing! What a cause for celebration!

But then again, you may not see immediate results. You may encounter resistance. Not everyone is going to fling their arms wide and say, “Thanks! That’s just what I needed to hear!” But take heart, it’s not up to you. It’s up to the work of the Holy Spirit. Be patient and loving, just as our Shepherd is with us.
So, what’s next? What do we do now? Think back to that shepherd. It’s not too hard to imagine that the probability of one (or more) of his sheep wandering off happened frequently. He was constantly on the lookout and eager to bring each one back. The encouragement is the same for us. Keep looking. Keep reaching out. Keep encouraging. Keep showing patience and loving care for anyone who needs to hear the comforting words of the Good Shepherd as he says, “Welcome Home!”

Dear Jesus, give me a caring, loving heart that is eager to reach out to those I know. Give me the words to share that encouragement with them in their faith. In your name I pray. Amen



Our devotion today is the final in the series focusing on the Welcome Home initiative. For more information and resources for the Welcome Home initiative, go to: welscongregationalservices.net/welcome-home



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Welcome! That Someone is Someone – Week of October 14, 2019

Welcome! That Someone is Someone – Week of October 14, 2019


Then Philip ran up the to chariot and heard the [Ethiopian] reading Isaiah the prophet. “Do you understand what you are reading?” Philip asked. “How can I,” he said, “unless someone explains it to me?”

Acts 8: 30-31 (For the complete account of Philip and the Ethiopian, read Acts 8:26-39)



You saw someone you were pretty sure you knew. But you saw them out of context. Too many years, too many faces. A former student? Someone from the old neighborhood? Everyone has found themselves at the awkward moment of recognition but not quite recollection. “You are . . . someone?” Ever get it wrong? At worst, we are embarrassed, and we likely embarrassed someone else.

In our account from Acts, far more is at stake than embarrassment. Our Ethiopian friend is struggling with the second scroll of Isaiah. He is reading from what we now know as Isaiah 53. He has come across one of the clearest prophecies as Christ’s substitutionary suffering and death for the sins of the world. Christians have used this very section of Scripture in worship on Good Friday for centuries because it is directly talking about Christ. But our Ethiopian friend is at his own awkward moment of some recognition but not proper recollection – “Is it Isaiah or someone else?”

At just the right time in just the right place, God picked up and placed someone there for the Ethiopian man. God brought Philip alongside the man’s chariot so he could explain who someone else is. The someone else is Jesus. The One who is, who was, and is to come to bring good news. Jesus is the One who gave his life as the ransom for the many. He is the innocent, blameless One who bears the innumerable sins of the whole world. Jesus silently was slaughtered to pay the price for sin – once and for all. This someone, this One is the Savior.

What a beautiful account! It is easy to see the miracle of how God used Philip as a very important someone in the Ethiopian’s life.

Do we realize and appreciate the incredible miracle of our own faith. We all are born into this sinful world with a sinful heart so darkened we couldn’t possibly comprehend the truth. We live in a sinful world so out of context of understanding who God is and what he is like. So in miracles of wonder and grace, God sent into our lives at just the right time and place, someone. A parent, a spouse, a friend, a pastor, a teacher, who brought us to the font and taught us the word of God. The Holy Spirit worked through the Word shared by someone. Now we truly are someone – a child of God, forgiven and loved by the One.

God now uses us as someone in the lives of others. Sometimes this is easy and joyful. We pass on precious truths to the next generation telling them the good news. Sometimes it can be far more awkward or uncomfortable. The next generation gets older and more defiant. Dearly loved friends and family members drift away from church. How will they know unless someone invites, encourages, explains? May God continue to encourage us and use us as someone in their lives.



Prayer Reflection: Give thanks to God for the many “someones” he has placed in our lives to bring us and keep us in the faith. Consider someone we know who needs to hear again of the only One who saves. Pray for love and humility to welcome them home to hear the good news.

Our devotion today continues to focus on the Welcome Home initiative. We consider how the unique relationship that teachers have with students and families, can provide an opportunity to encourage them spiritually, especially if they have drifted away from their church, their faith. For more information and resources for the Welcome Home initiative, go to: welscongregationalservices.net/welcome-home



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Welcome! Connect to the Means of Grace – Week of October 7, 2019

Welcome! Connect to the means of grace – Week of October 7, 2019


So is my word that goes out from my mouth: It will not return to me empty, but will accomplish what I desire and achieve the purpose for which I sent it.

Isaiah 55:11



I grew up in the Midwest. The only interaction I had with the ocean was through pictures, TV, or movies. I remember watching surfers in California gracefully maneuver over the waves. It looked so peaceful and like so much fun. Then, the time came for me to get my chance to venture into the ocean. My first call was to Southern California, so the ocean was within reach! When I got to the ocean for the first time, the smells, sounds, and sights were just as I had imagined. My childhood exposure from across the country didn’t lie. Then, one of my friends, a native of California, told me it was time to go out into the waves and take our turn at boogie boarding. Surfing was too hard for day one! He gave me a quick lesson on how to go out into the waves and where to catch them to ride them back in. One of the first waves I caught was way too late, and the wave picked me up, then slammed me down into the ground, and rolled me around like I was in a washing machine. I walked out of the ocean with a bloodied shoulder and a mouth full of sand. I had no clue what power waves had!

Sometimes it is easy to downplay or forget about the power that everyday things have. There is “hurtful power,” like being shocked by bare wires or slamming your finger in a car door. And there is “helpful power” – not the churning of breakers on the beach but hydroelectric power generated by massive turbines deep in a dam. What about God’s power? Do we fully recognize the power of God’s Word for daily life? Or do we not think that much about it?

We are blessed to be teachers in Christian schools where we don’t only use the Bible some of the day, but we use it to frame every subject that we teach. God’s love through his Word is woven into the fabric of the day for our students, and in that way the Holy Spirit is given the opportunity each day to work in the hearts of our students, and our hearts!

God tells us in Isaiah 55, “So is my word that goes out from my mouth: It will not return to me empty, but will accomplish what I desire and achieve the purpose for which I sent it.” Each day, we walk into our classrooms armed with the most powerful weapon of all time, and God promises us that it will work! And for most people, the most powerful and formative encounter with the Word happens in worship – not merely the content of the readings and sermon, but also the weekly reinforcement of the liturgy, and the deep impact of the Word expressed in hymns.

As you go about the privilege of your work today, may God fill you with the knowledge that his Word will not return to him empty. Be encouraged to use it and have loving conversations to keep students and families connected to this spiritual power source (especially as it is delivered in worship) and not to minimize or forget its power.



Prayer Reflection: Invite someone to Welcome Home Sunday at your church. Help them understand that you love them enough to connect to God’s powerful Word with them. Ask God to give you the courage and strength to help others gain access to his Word who may not be currently connected.

Our devotion today continues to focus on the Welcome Home initiative. We consider how the unique relationship that teachers have with students and families, can provide an opportunity to encourage them spiritually, especially if they have drifted away from their church, their faith. For more information and resources for the Welcome Home initiative, go to: welscongregationalservices.net/welcome-home



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Welcome! Build Relationships Today – Week of September 30, 2019

Welcome! Build Relationships Today – Week of September 30, 2019


Instead, we were like young children among you. Just as a nursing mother cares for her children, so we cared for you. Because we loved you so much, we were delighted to share with you not only the gospel of God but our lives as well.

1 Thessalonians 2:7-8



My mother always called herself the “mean lady” in the neighborhood. We never seemed to get away with much as she was always watching us from a distance to make sure my brothers and I behaved as we were supposed to. I remember specifically one time we were up to no good, and when I looked up … there was mom, both hands on her hips, and we knew we were going to spend some time paying our disciplinary dues.

At the time, it wasn’t a pleasant experience. But now I can laugh and recognize that my mom was loving us through discipline. In a family, love can take on so many different forms. It’s serving one another by cleaning up or cooking meals. It’s a kind word of encouragement when we are feeling down. It’s enjoying one another’s company by snuggling on the couch and falling asleep on a movie night. Love in a family is powerful.

In a Christ-centered family, that love is built on the truths of Scripture – a reflection of the love with no conditions that God offers us freely through Jesus. In a school or classroom, it is no different. You might be referred to as the mean teacher, and the kids might straighten up when they see you walk into the room, but they do that because of the love you show to them, not fear. Whether consciously or subconsciously, they know that God’s love guides you. How? Because you model it and talk about it.

Today’s verses give us some encouragement. “Instead, we were like young children among you. Just as a nursing mother cares for her children, so we cared for you. Because we loved you so much, we were delighted to share with you not only the gospel of God but our lives as well.” Notice the connection to relationships. They shared spiritual love, but they also shared their lives. They had genuine and meaningful relationships with one another.

That is the type of connection that teachers get to have with students. They build trusting relationships on the foundation of Christ’s work. They open their lives to their students and share the gospel at every turn. Those relationships build a high level of trust.

And here’s the kicker. Trust provides opportunity. There may be students in your classrooms today or your classrooms of old who are not continuing to stay connected to God’s Word. Their connection to the lifeline of Scripture may slowly be getting choked off. And that has eternal consequences.

As you walk into your classroom or school today to faces of God’s children that may be sleepy, angry, overflowing with energy, or just there, may God strengthen your ability to build relationships. May God help you to use those relationships to encourage connection to the beautiful Gospel message, because that message motivates us for today and secures our future in heaven.



Prayer Reflection: Look around your school or classroom today. Identify students and families that may be disconnected from the Word. Take a moment to write them a note or text them right now to encourage and invite them to connect to the Word with you – at church, over a devotion, or over coffee. Pray that God would work through you to connect with someone who may be straying from the life-giving Word.

Our devotion today continues to focus on the Welcome Home initiative. We consider how the unique relationship that teachers have with students and families, can provide an opportunity to encourage them spiritually, especially if they have drifted away from their church, their faith. For more information and resources for the Welcome Home initiative, go to: welscongregationalservices.net/welcome-home



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Welcome! Love with no Conditions – Week of September 23, 2019

Welcome! Love with no Conditions – Week of September 23, 2019


And so we know and rely on the love God has for us. God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in them.

1 John 4:16



You know that person, right? That person who loves you no matter what. There is nothing that you could do to break it. When you think about them, you can feel their warmth, care and concern for you. For me, as a child, that was grandma. Her loving smile, embrace, gifts, and care never changed. Ever. And that was despite my being a little boy who got into mischief, who argued with his brothers, and who accidentally broke things. Earthly love with no conditions is beautiful, heart-warming, and truly impactful.

In 1 John 4, we see the true foundation of love with no conditions. “God is love. Whoever lives in love lives in God, and God in them.” Consider the impact of God’s love for us. Christ has washed clean every single sin that we have ever committed and ever will commit. That is no small task. And he knows all of them, even the thoughts that no one on the face of this earth will ever know … the ones that would push us to red-faced embarrassment should they be found out. We have so much to be thankful for in our private relationship with our loving brother and Savior, Jesus.

As teachers, we have the opportunity each day to model Christ’s love with no conditions in our classrooms, on the playground, and wherever we serve. That modelling can only happen as we are filled with God’s grace and as the Holy Spirit empowers us through a deep and recurring connection to the Word and Sacraments. Only then can our modelling reflect Christ’s love — even though imperfectly, but still by God’s design.

What does that look like in your classroom, office, field, or stage? If you weren’t aware, we work with sinful students, parents, and coworkers. It is easy to become frustrated or maybe even resentful of the sin in other’s lives that cause us pain in our lives. In those moments which may even happen today, remember that Christ’s love living through us builds real, meaningful connections with those we serve. It allows us the opportunity to exert positive Christian influence as a family of faith. We are able to have real conversations about our faith, our struggles, and how God continues to guide us until we all reach eternity. It even gives us the opportunity to encourage students, parents, and coworkers to stay connected to Jesus and the spiritual power he wants us to have through regular worship with the family of believers.

May God grant you a joy that is rooted in your faith that understands his love with no conditions and allows you to model that love to those you serve today. God wants to build his kingdom as he lives through you!



Prayer Reflection: Write down the name of a family or student who may have disconnected from regular connection to the Word and Sacraments. Pray for that family and ask God to influence you to love them and model Christ’s love with no conditions. Pray that God would give you an opportunity to reconnect them in any way to his Word.

For the next few weeks, our devotions will focus on the Welcome Home initiative. We’ll consider how the unique relationship that teachers have with students and families, can provide an opportunity to encourage them spiritually, especially if they have drifted away from their church, their faith. For more information and resources for the Welcome Home initiative, go to: welscongregationalservices.net/welcome-home



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Why? – Week of September 16, 2019


Here is a trustworthy saying that deserves full acceptance: Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners—of whom I am the worst.

I Timothy 1:15



“Why?” “Why is a caterpillar fuzzy?” “Why do the leaves change colors?” “Why do we have to clean up?” “Why can’t I eat my cookie instead of my sandwich?” When we’re in the thick of things in the classroom, the “why” questions can be overwhelming. Even if we recognize the wonderful inquisitiveness behind them, it’s hard to find the time to answer them well. It’s also hard to answer in an age-appropriate way that a young child will understand. And quite frankly—we just plain don’t always know why!

You and I might find ourselves wondering why from time to time. Why does illness strike such a young child? Why can’t our staff get along better? Why is the world so full of chaos and heartache? Why, in spite of my best efforts, do I continue to make the same mistakes over and over? Some days teaching is hard. Why do I continue teaching?

Let’s reread today’s verse: “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners—of whom I am the worst.” We tell the children every day, all day, how much Jesus loves them. We tell them that Jesus forgives all their sins, the naughty things that they do. We tell them about the cross, the empty tomb, and heaven. But sometimes, in the busyness of all we do, we can lose sight of this for ourselves. He came to save sinners. That’s definitely me. On my own, I have nothing to bring to Jesus but my crushed, weary, sin-filled self. “Christ Jesus came… to save sinners”. Stop for a minute and just take that in. Are you a sinner? Then you are one he came to save. When he looks at you, he only sees the perfection you have because of what he did. That makes no sense in our earthly thinking but makes amazing sense when we consider his love for all sinners! It’s overwhelming and it’s our “why.” It’s why, through faith, we have peace in him and why we can share that peace with others. It’s why we have such a sense of urgency to share Jesus with all those around us. Because of what he did, we have an amazing “why” for all we do.

Why are there so many heartaches? Sin and its effect are all around us. Why, in the midst of all this worldly chaos, can we live and serve in joy and contentment? Because of Jesus. Why are caterpillars fuzzy? That’s a question for someone smarter at science than me. But you and I can live each day knowing that because of his love, his forgiveness, his grace, we have peace in Jesus. He is our “why.”



Prayer: Dear Jesus, you are my “why.” Your grace is my motivation. Thank you for coming to save sinners, including me. In your name I pray. Amen



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Our Daily Prayer – Week of September 9, 2019

Our Daily Prayer – Week of September 9, 2019


May the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be pleasing in your sight, O LORD, my Rock and my Redeemer.

Psalm 19:14



While I would tell you that I’m not a morning person, I have grown to love getting up earlier and relishing the quiet time shortly before the sun comes up. The world is still, and the day is in front of me. It feels like a clean slate, a fresh start. Each day is a gift of God’s grace. Morning feels like a reminder of this.

You may have heard the words in today’s verse at the beginning of a sermon. What a perfect prayer for the pastor as he begins to share God’s Word with the congregation! As he begins, he prays that his sermon will please God and effectively and correctly proclaim God’s message of salvation to all who hear it. What a perfect prayer for each of us as we begin another day.

We are not called to preach a sermon, but we have opportunities all day long to proclaim that same message to the children we serve, their families, and those around us. At the heart of everything we do is the gospel. Picture Jesus standing in front of you. His arms are out, holding the Word. He looks at you and says, “Tell them about me.” You may be tempted to look behind you to see if he was speaking to you. “Me?” “Yes, you.” What a privilege and what a responsibility!

Our sinful nature and shortcomings can get in the way of the message. They can lead us to hesitancy that we might say something wrong. We may be tempted to be over-confident and fail to be faithful in our time in the Word. What a wonderful prayer our verse for today can be as we begin each day, each task, and time we spend in the Word.

So as our day begins, early or not, we ask God to bless our words and our meditation on his Word so that all our words and actions are pleasing to him. We pray that he blesses all we do as a reflection of him and of his forgiveness and grace. He is our Rock and Redeemer. His grace is ours and ours to share in each new day of grace.



Prayer: Dear Jesus. May the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be pleasing in your sight, O LORD, my Rock and my Redeemer. Amen



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Appointed – Week of September 2, 2019

Appointed – Week of September 2, 2019


I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who has given me strength, that he considered me trustworthy, appointing me to his service.

1 Timothy 1:12



One of my favorite children’s books for the beginning of the year shares the story of a little girl on her first day of kindergarten. Annabelle is excited but also a bit apprehensive. Her older sister attempts to build her confidence by reminding her who she is—Annabelle Swift, kindergartner! After a couple of small setbacks that first day, Annabelle shines in her ability to count change and her teacher appoints her as the first milk monitor of the year. She carries out her role with a sense of pride and confidence. She can do this thing called kindergarten!

In our verse for today, Paul, the author of Timothy, starts by thanking Jesus for the strength he has given him. Paul was one of the vilest persecutors of Christians before the Lord came to him and converted him. And yet, this is exactly who the Lord chose for his ministry! The Lord considered him trustworthy and appointed him to his role as missionary. Note where Paul places the credit: “I thank Christ Jesus our Lord who has given me strength.” As gifted as he was, Paul acknowledges that all he does, all he can do, any blessings that come from his work are the direct result of what Christ has done to and through him. In these words, we hear a sense of gratitude and humility that also lead to confidence. “He [Christ] considered me worthy, appointing me to his service.” Christ also considers you worthy because of what he has done for you. He has redeemed you and appointed you to serve him in all you do whether in a classroom of little ones or in your daily life outside of school.

We have a tremendous responsibility—helping children to grow academically, socially, emotionally, and spiritually. We know ourselves and, if honest, we know our shortcomings all too well. On the outside we may give the impression that “we’ve got this!” while internally we may lack confidence. In humility we recognize our gifts, our areas of weakness, and our sinful nature. We can thank God for our gifts. We can look for forgiveness when we fail. We can ask the Lord to bless our efforts. And with each blessing that we see, we can confidently say, “It is the Lord!”

Annabelle’s confidence was boosted when her teacher noted her ability, giving her a responsibility. Our confidence comes from the Master Teacher, our Savior Jesus. Our confidence lies in the one who sends us, Jesus. He chose us and gave us gifts to serve him. He’s promised to be with us and bless our efforts in spite of our weaknesses. Like Paul, we can look to him for strength and give glory to the One who has chosen us.



Prayer: Dear Jesus, it is so easy to become discouraged in our work. Help us to remember that you are our strength. Bless all that we do, giving glory to you. In your name. Amen

A Question to Consider: No one can do everything, but we all have gifts. What are some things that you feel confident in doing? What are some things that you might say, “That’s not my gift”? Some of the latter are still things that need to be done, aren’t they? What can you do when asked or expected to do something that you don’t feel you have the gifts for? Can you find ways to grow in that area? Can you find someone to partner with who might have those gifts?



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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It’s Really Not About You – Week of August 26, 2019

It’s Really Not About You – Week of August 26, 2019


Be devoted to one another in love. Honor one another above yourselves.

Romans 12:10



“It’s really not about you.” Ouch. That is neither heartwarming nor motivating if taken at face value. We are sinners in a sin-filled world who intentionally and unintentionally crave our own needs first. Think of the young children you serve. You can likely identify behaviors in them that no one taught them but that demonstrate their sometimes desperate efforts to have their own needs met without consideration of those around them. While this may be a developmental stage for them, we are so often guilty of the same.

Devoted. Dictionary.com defines this as “zealous or ardent in attachment, loyalty, or affection.” If you are devoted to someone, you have an exceptional focus on them. A devoted friend will be there in any circumstance no matter what kind of inconvenience it may be for them. A devoted spouse puts the needs of their wife or husband ahead of theirs, even if it means giving up something for themselves. The ultimate devotion was that of Jesus to us. Oh my! When we think of what he set aside so that we can be children of God, forgiven sinners, heirs of heaven, it’s overwhelming. We can be filled with gratitude that can’t help but spill out to those around us. However…

We know ourselves and we know those around us. There’s the ever-kind, ever-willing colleague that is easy to love and easy to be the recipient of our devotion. But we are sinners serving with sinners. Not everyone is as easy to love, easy to be devoted to. Some try our patience and seem to hinder rather than help our efforts. My heart to serve them, encourage them, put their needs above mine, can be tested and challenged. I can share a long list of reasons to put my efforts elsewhere. Then, I think of myself and how I must look to my Savior. I think of my failures and shortcomings. I think of how much Jesus set aside to put me first. How can I, with that grace given so freely, not do the same for others? When I look at those around me through the eyes of Jesus, I see someone redeemed at the same great cost that was paid for me. The Holy Spirit fills my heart with devotion toward Jesus and those around me. Imagine the impact of a caring, loving devotion to people around us and on the ministry in which we serve. May the Lord give us hearts of love, patience, encouragement, and devotion to one another. God will take care of our needs. We are blessed with the joy of serving others in his name. It’s not about us. It’s all about Jesus.



Prayer: Dear Jesus, when I think of the devotion you have for me and all people, I’m humbled and filled with gratitude that is difficult to put into words. Forgive me for times when I’m not loving or patient with those around me. Forgive me when I’m quick to put my needs ahead of others. Bless and motivate me with the joy of knowing you are my Savior and I am your child. In your name I pray to you. Amen



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Dear… – Week of August 19, 2019

Dear… – Week of August 19, 2019


You show that you are a letter from Christ, the result of our ministry, written not with ink but with the Spirit of the living God, not on tablets of stone but on tablets of human hearts.

2 Corinthians 3:3



In the past couple of weeks, we’ve considered who we are in Christ— redeemed children and heirs. This is our motivation. Because of what God has done for us, we want to serve and to share Jesus with others. Last week we looked at setting our goals, prioritizing our time in the Word. This doesn’t diminish our time for the multitude of tasks but brings purpose and joy to all we do in Christ. This week let’s think about those we serve, the young children and their families, and the potential impact we can have in our time with them.

A letter of recommendation is often requested when you apply for a job or apply to school. Such a letter provides another piece of information for those considering the application. It is meant to reflect the person about whom the letter is written. In our reading today, Paul is writing to the Corinthians. It was a common practice in that time to carry a letter of recommendation. The letter could provide those receiving it, a connection to someone who they knew and could speak on their behalf.

“You are a letter from Christ.” I don’t know about you, but that stirs up mixed emotions. What an honor to think that I can reflect his love to others. What a privilege to be considered one of his representatives. But it’s also sobering. I know myself and my long list of shortcomings. I shudder to think that some of my actions might be the one thing that someone sees, knowing I’m a Christian. How often do I misrepresent his love and forgiveness for me in how I treat others? Each day, we can go to God in prayer asking for forgiveness for our shortcomings. We can pray for his blessings on all that we do and our efforts to share and reflect his love. We are able to begin each day with confidence, knowing that it is only the Spirit of the living God who brings those blessings to and through us.

A new school year is beginning. With it comes new students. Some have heard about their Savior Jesus since they were born. For some, they hear about Jesus occasionally. There may be some who have no knowledge of Jesus’ love and gift of salvation for them. What an amazing privilege you have! You are a walking letter, sharing God’s message of grace in a sin burdened world in your words, and often in ways unspoken. May the Holy Spirit bless and guide you. May the Lord strengthen you and those you serve as you continue to grow closer to him in faith each day.



Prayer: Dear Lord, I come to you today asking you to bless, guide, and guard my words each day. Through the Holy Spirit’s work, may I be a letter reflecting you to my students and their families. In your name I pray. Amen



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Show me – Week of March 13, 2017

Show me – Week of March 13, 2017


Show me your ways, O LORD, teach me your paths; guide me in your truth and teach me, for you are God my Savior, and my hope is in you all day long. Remember, O LORD, your great mercy and love for they are from of old.
Psalm 25:4-6 (NIV 1984)




ECME Devotion – March 13, 2017

Devotion based on Psalm 25:4-6

See series: ECME Devotions

How many times throughout the course of the day do you show a child how to complete a task? How many times do you model proper manners for a child? How many times during the day do you guide a child through right and wrong behavior? Our days are filled with these activities. They’re simply part of our job. We all have a teacher we fondly remember because they guided us in all the same ways as they brought learning to life for us.

Better than any earthly teacher, you and I have the master teacher, Jesus the Lord, who clearly shows us the path and lays out the way for us in the Bible. His words teach us the truth, and his life and ministry show us how to love. The words of David in these verses are a prayer asking that God show him the way and guide him on the path of life with the truth of the Bible. These words can and should be our daily prayer too.

These verses also plead for the Lord to remember his mercy. God’s mercy is that he doesn’t treat us as our sins deserve. We are sinful. We daily do things that are wrong. And yet, the Lord forgives us! The last words in these verses ask God to show us his mercy and love. We can confidently approach the Lord and ask for mercy, and his mercy is freely given to us.

As caretakers of young children, it is our responsibility to guide them through tasks. Thank the Lord, that He has shown us the path and guides us with the truth every day of our lives!



Prayer: Dear Heavenly Father please show us the way and guide us in all that we do. Thank you for the daily mercy that you show to us. Please grant us wisdom and guidance as we teach your little lambs. In your name, we pray. Amen.

A Question to Consider: How can we help prospects see that God’s mercy is a gift freely given to them?



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Angels watching over me – Week of March 6, 2017

Angels watching over me – Week of March 6, 2017


For He will command His angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways; they will lift you up in their hands, so that you will not strike your foot against a stone.
Psalm 91:11-12 (NIV 1984)




ECME Devotion – March 6, 2017

Devotion based on Psalm 91:11-12

See series: ECME Devotions

Close your eyes for a moment and think about outside time on the playground with a class of three, four, and five-year-olds. The playground is a wonderful place where both play and learning happen. Do you see children running? Do you see children swinging? Do you see children climbing and jumping off the play structure? When children are on the playground, they seem to be fearless. They trust that they are safe and that the teachers will protect them from getting hurt. The child-like faith trusts that God is with them and will keep them safe on the playground, in school, or wherever they might be.

As adults, we tend to be aware of the danger surrounding us in this world. We might worry about the children playing on the playground or maybe we worry about the safety of a family member or friend. These verses from Psalm 91 assure us that God always protects us, giving us comfort and peace to know that he commands his angels to guard us in all our ways. When we feel ourselves getting overwhelmed with fear, this passage is a great reminder for us all.

Just as the children on the playground have the child-like faith that God will protect them, so can you and I. We can go through our day with confidence because we trust God is protecting us!



Prayer: Dear Father, thank-you for commanding your angels to guard us in all our ways. Please help us to always find comfort and peace in your protection. In your name, we pray. Amen.

A Question to Consider: How can we strive to share the comfort and peace of God’s protection with both the child and the family who are going through a difficult situation?



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Rescued – Week of February 27, 2017

Rescued – Week of February 27, 2017


Out of the depths I cry to you, O LORD; O Lord, hear my voice…but with you there is forgiveness.
Psalm 130:1,2,4




ECME Devotion – February 27, 2017

Devotion based on Psalm 130:1,2,4

See series: ECME Devotions

It’s happened to every teacher and childcare worker at one time or another. You turn your head for just a moment and something bad happens to a child. We feel terrible. That’s what happened on October 14, 1987 in Midland, Texas. “Cissy” was helping at her sister’s in-home childcare program. When she turned to answer the phone, 18-month-old Jessica wandered across the backyard and fell into a well that was supposed to have been covered. “Baby Jessica” fell 22 feet into the well where she was trapped. The eyes of the nation focused on Baby Jessica as rescue workers dug another hole nearby and tunneled toward her.

Maybe sometimes you have felt as trapped as Baby Jessica was. Maybe the stress of your job, the grind of your calling and the worries of daily life leave you feeling trapped. No matter how hard you try, you can’t seem to get things fixed and going smoothly. But what traps us worst of all is our sins. Try as we might, we cannot stop ourselves from sinning. And the more we do, guilt weighs us down further and further. Nothing we do can make up for our sins. We are trapped in them and, therefore, doomed to eternal death. That’s how the Psalmist felt as he wrote Psalm 130 and begged for help, “Out of the depths I cry to you, O LORD; O Lord, hear my voice.”

They managed to rescue Baby Jessica. She is now a grown adult and as far as we know living a happy and healthy life. Jesus Christ rescued you from the depths of sin and death by his perfect life and perfect death on the cross. Because of Jesus, your guilt is gone. Your sins are forgiven, and you will live a happy life eternally in heaven.

Wednesday, March 1, is Ash Wednesday, the beginning of the church season of Lent. For the next 40 days, we will especially focus on the suffering and death of Jesus. This is a wonderful time to remind ourselves, the children in our care, and their families of how much Jesus loves us and how much he was willing to endure in order to save us from the depths of sin and death. With Jesus, there is forgiveness.



Prayer: Lord, I confess that I am trapped in my sin and guilt. Thank you for rescuing me, through your Son, Jesus Christ. Amen.



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Presidents Day – Week of February 20, 2017

Presidents Day – Week of February 20, 2017


I urge, then, first of all, that requests, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for everyone—for kings and all those in authority, that we may live peaceful and quiet lives in all godliness and holiness. This is good, and pleases God our Savior, who wants all men to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth.
I Timothy 2:1-4




ECME Devotion – February 20, 2017

Devotion based on I Timothy 2:1-4

See series: ECME Devotions

Few things get the hearts of childcare workers racing as the announcement, “The state inspector is here.” The state inspector can crawl through every inch and every file in your school. Even when you think that everything is correct, a state inspector can still find some form that isn’t initialed properly and “write you up.” It can be nerve wracking.

Even though a state inspector can make us nervous, we know that they are necessary. The state has the job of keeping its citizens—especially children who can’t defend themselves—safe from any harm or danger. Think for a moment how miserable life would be without a government to watch over us. With no military or police to keep us safe, life would be chaos. No one would ever be safe. The state is God’s agent for protecting us so we can live peaceful lives, raise our families, go to work and even work in a childcare facility or school where families can safely leave their children.

God took care of our greatest needs when he sent Jesus Christ to live and die for us. All of our sins are forgiven. Heaven is in our future. Our loving Lord also provides for our physical needs, quite often through our government. As we celebrate President’s Day, pause to give thanks to the Lord for all of the blessings that he has poured out on you through our government and its leaders. (Why not try to list 10? 20? More?) And then follow St. Paul’s advice to pray for our president and all government officials, even state inspectors.



Prayer: Lord, thank you for providing for all of my spiritual needs through your Son, Jesus Christ. Thank you, also, for providing for our physical needs through our government and its officials. Give them wisdom and strength to carry out their callings so that we can live in peace and quietness as we rejoice in your love and share it with others. Amen.

A Question to Consider: While it may be tempting to focus on the challenges our country faces, what are the blessings we have as Christians living in the United States? Collaborate with a colleague to create a list of those blessings.



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Our dearest love – Week of February 13, 2017

Our dearest love – Week of February 13, 2017


Therefore, as God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. Bear with each other and forgive whatever grievances you may have against one another. Forgive as the Lord forgave you. And over all these virtues put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity.
Colossians 3:12-14




ECME Devotion – February 13, 2017

Devotion based on Colossians 3:12-14

See series: ECME Devotions

Everyone is excited to celebrate Valentine’s Day this week. Valentine was a Christian young man who lived in Rome in the third century. According to legend, he was deeply in love and planned to get married soon. At that time, Christianity was illegal and all Christians were declared guilty of treason. Rather than deny their Savior, though, many Christians boldly confessed their faith in Jesus. Valentine was one of those confessors who remained true to Christ and was arrested.

While he was in jail, awaiting his death in the arena, Valentine wrote a number of beautiful, impassioned letters to his would-be bride. He assured her of his great love for her. But he also made it clear that first place in his heart was reserved for Jesus, his Savior. History tells us that on February 14, in the year 269, Valentine was put to death, martyred for Jesus Christ. In the year 496—after Christianity was an accepted religion—the church declared February 14 to be St. Valentine’s Day.

While the Christian significance of this day has been pretty well forgotten by now, we can let this background for Valentine’s Day bring us past superficial sentimentality to the greatest love of all—the love of God for the world. Jesus showed true love by giving his life for us on the cross in order to pay for our forgiveness so we could have eternal life in heaven.

The sacrificial love of Jesus touches our hearts and fills us with gratitude. It moves us to show “true love” to one another. “True love” is not just sweet emotions, but a commitment to help, regardless of the cost or consequence. The love we show to the children and to one another begins with the knowledge and joy of knowing that we are God’s chosen people, holy and dearly loved. Filled up with God’s love, we will be kind and loving toward others on Valentine’s Day and always.



Prayer: Lord Jesus, thank you for your unconditional and unending love that saved me. Help me to say “Thank You” to you by sharing that same love with others. Amen.



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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With us in the storms – Week of February 6, 2017

With us in the storms – Week of February 6, 2017


Then he got into the boat and his disciples followed him. Without warning, a furious storm came up on the lake, so that the waves swept over the boat. But Jesus was sleeping. The disciples went and woke him, saying, “Lord, save us! We’re going to drown!” He replied, “You of little faith, why are you so afraid?” Then he got up and rebuked the winds and the waves, and it was completely calm. The men were amazed and asked, “What kind of man is this? Even the winds and the waves obey him!”
Matthew 8:23-27




ECME Devotion – February 5, 2017

Devotion based on Matthew 8:23-27

See series: ECME Devotions

Experienced fishermen were terrified that they were going to drown. Meanwhile, Jesus was sleeping – as if he didn’t care, as if he fell asleep on the job of protecting them.

Does it sometimes seem that Jesus doesn’t care or that he’s fallen asleep on the job of protecting you? What storms are stressing you out? What winds are buffeting you? Is your doctor concerned and ordering more tests? Are finances squeezing you? Are there problems with some children or their parents? Are there issues in your own family? Are there struggles with other staff members as you trudge through the long winter? If Jesus loves us, then why do these bad and sad things happen to us?

Even though Jesus was sleeping, he didn’t forget about his disciples. He could have woken up and calmed the storm before they panicked. He could have stopped the storm before it even started. But he stayed sleeping and he used the storm to teach his disciples to look to him in every need. He taught them that they couldn’t solve all of their own problems. They couldn’t keep themselves safe. They needed help. They despaired of their own efforts and turned to Jesus.

Jesus wants us to turn to him, too. He knows we need his help, not just to get through some stressful situation in our daily lives, but especially for the forgiveness of sins. He uses the storms in our lives to get us to keep our focus on him. Jesus will not fall asleep on the job. He will keep providing what you need for each day. He will keep forgiving. He is your Savior who even controls the winds and the waves for the good of his people. Stay focused on him.



Prayer: Dear Jesus, thank you for your constant attention to my needs, especially my greatest need of salvation. Amen.

A Question to Consider: What are your storms right now? If you were encouraging someone else with your same storms, what would you say to them? What would be your prayer for them?



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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A Tall Order – Week of January 30, 2017

A Tall Order – Week of January 30, 2017


Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer. Share with God’s people who are in need. Practice hospitality. Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse. Rejoice with those who rejoice; mourn with those who mourn. Live in harmony with one another.
Romans 12:12-16




ECME Devotion – January 30, 2017

Devotion based on Romans 12:12-16

See series: ECME Devotions

This verse is a tall order – a command, in fact. Be patient in affliction, faithful in prayer, share, bless those who persecute you, and finally live in harmony with one another. It looks really impressive in writing. Wouldn’t life be so wonderful if we followed this command? But in reality, life is messy and we fall short daily. It is hard to be patient when it feels like the world or sometimes even your close family is against you. It is hard to share with the homeless person on the corner when we selfishly wonder why he is in this situation. It is hard to be hospitable when people seem to look down on you. It is hard to bless those who show hatred toward us in the form of discrimination for what we believe. It is hard to rejoice with others when deep-down we wanted that same blessing for ourselves. Living in harmony is hard too. Hardly a day passes without feeling offended by someone’s words or actions, or knowing you have offended someone.

It’s hard, impossible even, when we look at how others have wronged us. We may think that they don’t deserve our kindness. And it’s hard, impossible, when we look at how we have wronged others. So we must look elsewhere. We look to Jesus Christ who is always patient, always kind, and always loving to us. His unending love motivates our kindness and eagerness to follow through on this tall order. His love is the reminder of our opportunity to reflect him to others so they see his patience, his faithfulness, his love.

God doesn’t say these things will be easy. He simply says “be” this way. We are NOT by nature joyful, patient, and harmonious! We are quite the opposite – grumpy, impatient, rude, selfish, and the list goes on. Thankfully, God sent his Son to be our Savior, to offer forgiveness to us each and every time we fall short of living up to this command. We thank him for his overwhelming and indescribable gift! And with hearts of humble gratitude we are more able to be patient, faithful in prayer, generous to others, and to strive to live in harmony with others around us. We look at those we know as someone for whom Christ came, for whom Christ suffered and died, for whom he rose, and for whom he returned to prepare a place for in heaven we are eager to reach out to them in love.



Prayer: Dear Jesus, help me be patient in suffering and faithful in prayer. Give me opportunities to share your love through my hospitality. Give me wisdom to know how to live in harmony with the people around me. Forgive me when I fall short each day. Amen.



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Favor that Never Fades – Week of January 23, 2017

Favor that Never Fades – Week of January 23, 2017


The Spirit of the Sovereign LORD is on me, because the LORD has anointed me to preach good news to the poor. He has sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim freedom for the captives and release from darkness for the prisoners, to proclaim the year of the LORD’s favor and the day of vengeance of our God, to comfort all who mourn, and provide for those who grieve in Zion—to bestow on them a crown of beauty instead of ashes, the oil of gladness instead of mourning, and a garment of praise instead of a spirit of despair. They will be called oaks of righteousness, a planting of the LORD for the display of his splendor.
Isaiah 61:1-3




ECME Devotion – January 23, 2017

Devotion based on Isaiah 61:1-3

See series: ECME Devotions

What a year-if you were a Cub fan or even a new Cub fan in 2016. 107 years is a crazy long time to wait and hope for the outcome they experienced -World Series champs. Cub fans everywhere celebrated in the streets, in local establishments, in their homes. But when you read the opening words of this paragraph, did you feel that same excitement or even close to that of the day of that final game? Likely not even close. Time has faded the enthusiasm of the day.

Our verses today include a reference to “the year of the LORD’s favor.” What is the year of the Lord’s favor? It comes from an Old Testament law where during the Year of Jubilee all debts were forgiven, property was returned to the original owner, and anyone enslaved because of debts were released. Did you notice the next phrase- “the day of vengeance of our God?” We have a God of both law and gospel. He expects perfection which is impossible for us. He freely gives us his grace, his undeserved love, his mercy. Some will say that God’s favor is all about success, winning an award (or World Series) or getting that scholarship, doing kind things for others, always trying to do our best.

The Lord’s favor is not about success in our earthly endeavors or our attempts at doing our best. Isaiah’s prophecy is all about God looking on the unsuccessful with his favor. The poor, the brokenhearted, the prisoners, and those who mourn are in a position to recognize their need for God to accomplish what they and we could not. Because he looked on humanity favorably, the Heavenly Father sent his Son to defeat sin, death, and the devil for us. Despair is replaced by praise, ashes by a heavenly crown, mourning by gladness.

While earthly success (even for Cub fans) does not last, God’s favor does. World Series winners eventually lose again. But God’s favor, God’s gift of love, grace, and forgiveness are ours each day and for eternity. It is a gift that will never fade! We are in a unique position to be instruments of showing God’s favor, not only on the each of the children and families we serve, but to all with whom we come in contact – as God’s favor is for all.



Prayer: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, use me to proclaim and reflect your gospel message of grace and favor to all around me with joy. Amen.



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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The Bonds of Peace – Week of January 16, 2017

The Bonds of Peace – Week of January 16, 2017


I urge you to live a life worthy of the calling you have received. Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love. Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.
Ephesians 4:1-3




ECME Devotion – January 16, 2017

Devotion based on Ephesians 4:1-3

See series: ECME Devotions

When I consider the highs and lows that I have felt through previous school years, December was more often a challenging time. I faced the lows, feeling overwhelmed, being behind in my lessons in the middle of a full holiday schedule, and facing student or parent issues coming to a head at the end of the semester. I always needed Christmas break – a well-timed respite. After that break, January has regularly been a high point.

Maybe you have noticed a regular pattern similar to mine, or maybe it’s different for you in January. And even if you haven’t seen a pattern develop year to year, you certainly have experienced life’s roller coaster ride of highs and lows. Good classroom experiences can be followed by center challenges. Thinking, “I’ve got this; I can do this!” is soon followed by, “Why would God allow me to go through this?”

God tells us in Ephesians to be humble, gentle, patient, loving, and live in unity. Wow! That command can bring us back to our low feelings. How can we live that way all the time? We lose our patience with a parent who was irritated this morning. We are still upset and holding a grudge with our coworker who didn’t finish a project on time. We think we are better than our coworker who is facing a temptation. It is easy to use this verse to look ourselves in the mirror and become discouraged or want to give up!

Paul’s words to the Ephesians remind us of the important constant that does not change; God has called you. Wherever you find yourself on life’s rollercoaster, his love for you remains constant. You are living under his constant grace. He has called you, undeserving as you are because of sin, to believe that Jesus Christ has rescued you from the penalty for your sins. You have been called to be a member of God’s family. When you know the calling you have received, you have a motivation and a power to make every effort to live up to the wonderful calling you have received. By faith we eagerly “make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace” with all those around us.



Prayer: Jesus, forgive me for the times I have not been gentle, humble, and loving. Remind me it is not my faithfulness and my ability that makes you love me. Your loving grace called me to faith. I pray that you strengthen my faith and so empower me to be completely humble, gentle, patient, and loving to those around me. Amen.

A Question to Ponder: In a previous devotion, we talked about finding ways to pray for each child in our classrooms on a regular basis. How can we do the same for those with whom we serve and for the parents of the children in our rooms?



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Sharers Together – Week of January 2, 2017

Sharers Together – Week of January 2, 2017


This mystery is that through the gospel the Gentiles are heirs together with Israel, members together of one body, and sharers together in the promise in Christ Jesus.
Ephesians 3:6




ECME Devotion – January 2, 2017

Devotion based on Ephesians 3:6

See series: ECME Devotions

Happy New Year! It’s a time where many make New Year resolutions. New Year’s resolutions – have you ever noticed how they can easily become self-centered. I want to do this, or that – or accomplish my goal. Even as you resolve, “I want to be a better person”, selfish pride shows his arrogant head.
In our text today, Paul speaks of a mystery. The mystery Paul speaks about provides a wonderful and unselfish starting point for a Christian resolution, “Lord, let me be a sharer!” What we do in our classrooms, homes, and churches this year is not about us being better. It’s about the promise of Christ bringing people together on the way to heaven.

Permit me to tell you about Katherine. She sat in my class each day with her big, brown eyes filled with reverence. She was being raised in a combination of cultures and languages: one parent from the Middle East and the other from Latin America, yet living in the Southern United States. Katherine was taught to be submissive. She was about half the size of her fellow first graders – frail, her legs dangling from the smallest chair we had in the room. She did not speak unless spoken to, and then it was in the quietest whisper voice.

Katherine had never been introduced to this Jesus we talked about every day. When it was time to study the history of Jesus’ death and resurrection, she was obviously anxious. Our story ended with Jesus hanging on the cross . . . the next day we would study the resurrection. However, for Katherine, the suspense was too great. She could not wait until tomorrow. During math class she nervously held the Bible story book on her lap, trying to keep it hidden from me. She would never think of disobeying during class time and not paying attention, however, she was desperate. She needed to know how the story ended. I saw her – her eyes intently reading the next part of the story. I did not stop her. In fact, I smiled at her and gave her an approving nod. How could I make math class more important than the resurrection of her Lord and Savior?

So, our resolution for this year? “Let me be a sharer!” As you look at each child in your room or classroom, consider the amazing story of Jesus’ grace and mercy for each child, each family, each staff member, and you! Like little Katherine, may we never lose that sense of urgency to know more and to share more about our precious Savior.



Prayer: Lord Jesus Christ, thank you for making each of us sharers of the mystery of salvation. Empower me to take this promise you have given to me and share it with others this year, and always. Amen.

A Question to Ponder: Consider each child and family in your room or classroom. Beginning by praying for each of them on a regular basis can help you to be more aware of ways to share the gospel with them. Are there ways to be sure to pray for each child and each family individually? Would a calendar work? Or a prayer partner on your staff? Or?



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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Joy to the World? – Week of December 26, 2016

Joy to the World? – Week of December 26, 2016


“Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth.  I did not come to bring peace, but a sword.”
Matthew 10:34




ECME Devotion – December 26, 2016

Devotion based on Matthew 10:34

See series: ECME Devotions

So, how was your Christmas dinner discussion?  If your Christmas discussion went great, then be thankful for that.  Some of you reading this possibly didn’t have a very good Christmas discussion.  I know that some of you out there found yourself in a discussion (argument?) about Christian truths and values.  Some of you may have even found yourselves defending the Christmas message, the very reason for your gathering, against the attacks of your own families!

Let’s move this discussion away from the Christmas dinner table for a second.  How have your Facebook discussions gone?  Have you found yourself in a similar argument on the internet?

At this time of Christmas, we often talk about peace and joy.  The heart of faith finds these in the message of the Gospel.  When the world around us is crashing down, we find safety, security, and spiritual peace in the fortress of God’s Word.  But why do we often find the exact opposite of peace and joy–hatred and discord–seemingly everywhere?  Didn’t Jesus promise that he would bring peace to the earth?

Yes, he did.  He promised peace on earth between God and his believers.  But that same Jesus also promised enmity and hostility between his people and the unbelieving children of Satan.  In fact, when the believer lives according to the Word, he often finds himself in conflict with others, even those who are closest to him.  The words of Jesus in our passage above remind us that we can’t expect peace and joy when we follow his commands.  Instead, we can expect to get challenged every step of the way.

In our schools and childcare centers, we are preparing the next generation to know God’s Word.  We want our young ones to know Christ, but we also want them to make him known.  That might put them in situations where they are hated, put down, and left feeling defeated.  That’s OK-Jesus promised the believer to expect exactly that.  That is why we also teach our children to find refuge in the saving message of the Gospel.  We want them to remember the words, “If God is for us, who can be against us?” (Romans 8:31)



Prayer:
Joy to the world, the Lord is come!
Let earth receive her King;
Let ev’ry heart prepare him room
And heav’n and nature sing,
And heav’n and nature sing,
And heav’n and heav’n and nature sing.
(Christian Worship: A Lutheran Hymnal 62)



Early Childhood Ministry Educator’s (ECME) Devotions are brought to you by WELS Commission on Lutheran Schools.
All Scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV®. Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.™ Used by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved worldwide.

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